Michael S. Stoker

Male 1805 - 1858  (53 years)


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  • Name Michael S. Stoker 
    Born 10 Feb 1805  , Ashe, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 30 Mar 1858  Trader's Point (now Council Bluffs), Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Graybill-Stoker Cemetery, Garner Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I443  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 17 Jan 2015 

    Father Michael Stoker or Stocker,   b. 24 Mar 1762, Frederick, Frederick, Maryland, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 27 Oct 1836, of, Caldwell, Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 74 years) 
    Mother Catherine Eller,   b. 6 Mar 1773, , Rowan, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 7 Aug 1856, Kane Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 83 years) 
    Married 7 Feb 1792  of, Ashe, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F264  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Martha McDaniel,   b. 24 Feb 1808, Raccoon Township, Gallia, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Feb 1873, Trader's Point (now Council Bluffs), Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Married 1 Jan 1829  , , Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Gabriel McNiel Stoker,   b. 23 Oct 1829, Bloomfield Township, Jackson, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 May 1852, Trader's Point (now Council Bluffs), Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years)
     2. David Newbury Stoker,   b. 2 Feb 1832, Bloomfield Township, Jackson, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jun 1852, Trader's Point (now Council Bluffs), Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 20 years)
     3. William Moroni Stoker,   b. 10 Jul 1834, Bloomfield Township, Jackson, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Sep 1929, Union, Union, Oregon, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 95 years)
     4. John Alexander Stoker,   b. 23 Aug 1837, Long Creek, Caldwell, Missouri, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Sep 1918, Baker, Baker, Oregon, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
     5. Michael James Stoker,   b. 23 May 1840, Columbus, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jul 1922, Union, Union, Oregon, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     6. Jared Samuel Stoker,   b. 19 Mar 1843, Bear Creek, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Dec 1912, Union, Union, Oregon, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     7. Joseph Jehiel Stoker,   b. 26 Apr 1846, near Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Nov 1921, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     8. Martha Rebecca Stoker,   b. 1 Jan 1849, Trader's Point (now Council Bluffs), Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Oct 1871, Trader's Point (now Council Bluffs), Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years)
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F271  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. Censuses:
      1820 US: Bloomfield Township, Jackson, Ohio, pg. 195, township had a little over 40 families; related families include James Lackey, Michael Stoker, and Michael Graybill. In neighboring Madison Township, related families David Stoker, Peter Graybill, Nancy (Graybill) Henson, and James McDaniel are found. Columns are male 0-10, 10-16, 16-18, 16-26, 26-45, 45+// female 0-10, 10-16, 16-26, 26-45, 45+:
      Michael Stoker: 2,1,0,1,0,1//1,1,0,0,1. [Appears to be Michael, his wife Catherine, and their children John, Michael, Rebecca, Catherine, Jacob, and Eller; the three oldest appear gone in this census.]
      Michael Graybill: 3,0,0,0,1,0//1,0,0,1,0.
      James Lackey: 2,2,1,2,0,1//1,2,1,1,5.

      1830 US: Bloomfield Township, Jackson, Ohio, pg. 109-112, note whole township had 527 people living in it, related families include Michael Stoker, Michael Stoker Jr., Alexander Lackey, James Welker, Michael Graybill, and John Stoker:
      Michael Stoker, Jr. Males 0-5:1; 20-30:1; 60-70:1. Females 5-10:1; 20-30:1. [Appears to be Michael, his wife Martha, and their oldest son Gabriel; unsure who 5-10 year old girl would be since this couple was married only one year before.]

      1840 US: Quincy, Adams, Illinois, the following related families living in near proximity to each other (with exception of John McDaniel and his wife Christina Stoker, all of David Stoker's siblings, children, and mother are accounted for and it confirms his father Michael was dead by 1840):
      P. 43a:
      David Stoker, males 5-10:1; 40-50:1//females 5-10:1; 10-15:1; 40-50:1. [David, his wife Barbara, and their children Sarah (13), Catherine (11?), and Michael (6). Note daughter Nancy not in census which means she was probably deceased by then.]
      Simeon P. Grabell [Graybill], males 0-5:1; 20-30:1//females 0-5:1; 20-30:1. [David's nephew: Simeon and his wife Amanda Hill and their two oldest children.]
      Jacob Stoker, males 20-30:1//females 0-5:1; 20-30:1. [Younger brother to David: Jacob and his wife Catherine and their oldest child.]
      P. 44a:
      Eller Stoker, males 20-30:1//females 0-5:1; 15-20:1; 60-70:1. [Youngest brother to David: Eller with his wife Margaret and their oldest child and probably their mother Catherine Eller.]
      James Walker [Welker], males 10-15:1; 15-20:1; 30-40:1//females 5-10:2; 40-50:1. [Living next door to Eller and ages work perfectly that this is James Welker and Elizabeth Stoker, who is David's sister.]
      John W. Stoker, males 0-5:2; 10-15:1; 30-40:1//females 0-5:1; 5-10:2; 30-40:1. [John and his wife Electa Sarah and their six oldest children.]
      John Stoker, males 0-5:1; 20-30:1//females 0-5:1; 5-10:2; 20-30:1. [David's son: John and his wife Jane and their children.]
      P. 52a:
      William Stoker, males 0-5:1; 20-30:1//females 20-30:1 (father-in-law Samuel Winegar is next door). [David's son William and his wife Almira with their child.]
      P. 55a:
      Michael Stoker, males 0-5:2; 5-10:2; 10-15:1; 30-40:1// females 30-40:1. [Michael, his wife Martha, and their five oldest children.]

      1850 US: District 21, Pottawattamie, Iowa, p. 67b, household and family #62 [note judging from 1834 birth of Moroni, it would appear family was Mormon by that date by using a Book of Mormon name for the son]:
      Michael Stoker, 41, no occupation, NC.
      Martha, 39, Ohio.
      Gabriel, 21, laborer, Ohio.
      David, 18, Ohio.
      Maroni, 16, Ohio.
      Alexander, 13, Ohio.
      Michael, 10, Ill.
      Jared, 6, Ill.
      Joseph, 4, Ill.
      Rebecca, 2, Ill.

      1851 Iowa State: Pottawattamie County. FHL film 1022203. The entire state was counted but only Pottawattamie listed everyone by name in the household and their ages; other counties only listed the head of the household and a numerical count without names of the various ages by sex in the household. No date is given when the census was taken but it was certified in Dec. 1851; however, the other counties show a Sep 1851 date which also appears more likely for Pottawattamie as well in light of ages given some children with known birthdays in October. Census return:
      Stoker: Michael 46, Martha 44, Gabriel M. [male] 21, David N. 19, William M. 16, John A. 13, James M. 10, Jared 7, Joseph J. 4, Martha R. 2. [Note that the following related families are in this census and very close neighbors: Simeon P. Graybill, Michael/Polly Graybill with Polly's mother Catherine Eller Stoker, Eller/Margaret Stoker, Jacob/Catherine Stoker, Philip/Catherine Gatrost, David/Barbara Stoker, Edward/Sarah Davis, and William/Almira Stoker. Other relatives in same county but separated by several pages of census include the following families: Thomas/Hannah Pilling whose daughter Hannah, later marries William Lenore Graybill, Levi/Patience Graybill, John W./Sarah Stoker, Hannah Ford whose son Martin later marries Zibiah M. Stoker, and John/Sarah Smith.]

      1854 Iowa: Kane, Pottawattamie, Iowa, FHL film 1022207. Next door neighbors include Philip "Gastrop," Simeon "Grabill," and Eller Stoker. Neighbor a couple of census pages away include M. Stoker and M. Ford. Census return:
      M. Stoker, 4 males, 2 females, 1 voter, 1 militia, 6 total.

      1856 Iowa: (From Ancestry.com) Kane, Pottawattamie, Iowa, p. 28 of 63, 175/176 (family of Martin Ford is two doors away); also note the family has been residents of the state for 8 years:
      Michael Stoker, 51, NC, farmer. (Also includes some agricultural production figures.)
      Martha, 48, OH.
      Moroni, 21, OH, farmer.
      Alexander, 18, MO.
      M.J., 16, IL.
      Jared, 13, IL.
      J.J, 10, IL.
      Rebecca M., 7, IA.

      2. The book "The Henry McDaniel family, 1755-1975," by Esta McDaniel Lee, 1975, FHL 929.273 M141L, p. 82: "Other McDaniels of Gallia and Jackson Counties, Ohio. David McDaniel, b. ca. 1738 m. 5 March, 1801, Elizabeth (Betsy) McCarley in Washington County, Ohio. Gallia County was a part of Washington Coound at that time. David McDanieal was in Ohio long before it became a state for a son James McDaniel was born in what is now Jackson County, 24 Feb. 1762. He married 19 Dec 1805 Zebiah (Sibby) McCarley, b. 10 Dec 1786, Gallia County, Ohio, daughter of John McCarley. She died 5 Feb 1860. James died in Jackson County, 1820. They had the following children:
      1. Sarah McDaniel, b. 26 May 1806, Raccoon Twp., Gallia Co., O., d. 7 Mar 1857, m. John W. Stoker, 13 Mar 1827.
      2. Martha McDaniel, b. 24 Feb 1808, Raccoon Twp., Gallia Co., O., d. 4 Feb 1877 [year appears erroneous], m. 1828/29 Michael Stoker.
      3. Jane McDaniel, 24 Feb 1810, Raccoon Twp., Gallia Co., O., d. 20 Jan 1890, in Bountiful, Utah, m. 1836, John Stoker.
      4. John McDaniel, b. 10 Jun 1812, Jackson Co., O., d. 11 Nov 1884, Alpine, Utah, m. Christina Stoker.
      5. William McDaniel, b. 1814, Jackson Co., O., d. 1889 unmarried.
      There could have been others."
      Page 83: "Jackson County Marriage Records. C.D. Massie:
      19 Apr 1827 Electa Sally McDaniel to John W. Stoker."

      3. FHL Book 929.273EL54h "George Michael Eller and Descendants of His in America," compiled by James W. Hook, 1957, also on FHL film 896571, item 2, pp. 17-31, clarifies early North Carolina counties and land grant practices:
      "Land grants in North Carolina originated with an entry application which was filed in the county where the land was situated and if not lost are now on file there. This was followed, sometimes soon and sometimes years later by an order from the land office for the tract to be surveyed. Sometimes soon and sometimes years later the survey was made and a surveyor's plat filed with the Secretary of State in Raleigh. Then came the grant which may have been issued reasonably near the date of the survey or sometimes several years later. These grants, orders to survey and the survey itself are on file now in the Secretary of State's office at Raleigh...
      Many counties were formed from what originally was Rowan County, namely Surry and Guilford in 1770, Burke and Wilkes in 1777, Randolph in 1779, Iridell in 1788, Stokes in 1789, Buncomb in 1791, Ashe in1799, Davidson in 1822, Yancey in 1833, Davie in 1836 and Yadkin in 1850. Some of these counties were grandchildren of Rowan County; for instance Wilkes was taken partly from Burke and partly from Surry, Randolph from Guilford, Buncomb and Yancy form Burke, Ashe from Wilkes and Stokes and Yadkin from Surry. These facts must be kept in mind when tracing early Rowan County families."

      4. From Sep 2006 Internet, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Ridge.2509/brownson.html: It appears the Stoker family probably knew the Seymour Brunson family of nearby Lawrence Co., Ohio. Brunson had served with Luke Johnson in 1832. In 1833 he is again with Luke in the area as are Zerubbabel Snow and Amasa Lyman. He is also specifically in Bloomfield, Jackson, Ohio in Nov. 1834 when his son his born and also per letters he wrote. He appears generally in Kirtland thereafter. His journal notes that in July 1836 he visited the church in Bloomfield. He does note the baptism of John Stoker 13 Nov 1837. It was at his funeral in Nauvoo in 1840 that Joseph Smith first revealed the doctrine of baptisms for the dead.

      5. Nauvoo LDS Land and Records Office research file (copy in my possession as of 2 Jun 2007 and also partially viewable at www.earlylds.com). Includes: 70s Record: Qrm 26 per Bk B Sel, LDS Arc, pg. 96. Also notes that he lived in Centerpoint, Iowa after Nauvoo. He was ordained 1839.

      6. From the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT. The following is a partial excerpt from the longer article entitled "David Stoker and Barbara Graybill," which is quoted in its entirety in the notes of David Stoker:
      "By August of 1815 David and Barbara had settled into family life in Bloomfield, Jackson County, Ohio. It was on the 24 August 1815 that their first child was born: Christine Stoker. By the spring of 1816, David's parents had also joined them on the new frontier of the Ohio River Valley. David and his father, Michael, are listed on the Jackson County, Ohio, voting registry for an election that was held on 1 April 1816. Also, David's youngest brother, Eller, was born in Bloomfield, Ohio...
      David and his family are not listed on the 1830 census records for Ohio or Indiana. (The family of John Stoker listed on the 1830 census in Ohio is that of David's brother, John W. Stoker.)...
      Between the years of 1830 to 1836 David and Barbara Stoker along with some of the extended family received missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Some of these missionaries were: Seymour Brunson, John A. Fisher, and Luke Johnson. All baptized members of the Stoker family into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. John Stoker (David's son) was baptized by Seymour Brunson and Luke Johnson in 1834. David's younger brother, Michael Jr., baptized Barbara in 1836. ('LDS Biographical Encyclopedia.' Andrew Johnson Vol 2 pg. 252. Luke Johnson, Autobiography in 'Millennial Star' 1864, Lewis p 92)
      Some members of the Graybill family also joined the church as their baptismal dates and offices they held within the church are listed in the records of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
      An article in the local paper records that there was strong religious persecution against members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Vega area. This fighting lead to some families leaving Vega. ('Jackson Herald,' Friday, February 27, 1959 and cited in Jim Stoker's Stoker history 1993)
      It was in the fall and winter of 1836 that David Stoker, his father, Michael, with their families and some of the Graybill families left the Ohio valley traveling west. On the 15 August 1838, David bought 52+ acres of land in Harrison County, Indiana. His brother, William, bought 120 acres in Madison County, Indiana. (Bureau of Land Management- Eastern States- General land Office, records of the Ohio River Valley Survey)
      Other members of the extended Stoker family were already living in Indiana. David's sister, Elizabeth and her husband, James Welker, were married in Henry County, Indiana in 1828, and it's possible that their first son was born there. Albert Koons, a relative of Catherine Eller (David's mother), lived in Henry County, Indiana along with other Eller families. (The Indiana connections need to be fully researched to understand the detail of the different families movements.)...
      The census records and genealogical family groups sheets illustrate some of David and Barbara's journeys. The history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints records members of the Graybill, McDaniel, and Welker families migrated west staying with the main body of the church to settle in Caldwell County, Missouri, near the town of Far West.
      [Picture, pg. 61: "Caldwell County, Missouri. Township 55 North of the base line. Range 28 west of the 5th principal meridian.
      Section 8 NW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 John W. Stoker's land -1837.
      Section 8 SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 James Welker's land -1837.
      Section 9 SW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 Eller Stoker's land -1837.
      (From the map archives of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints)")...
      During July of 1837 three families of the Stoker clan filed forty acre land deeds in Missouri. They were located seven to eight miles southeast of Far West, Missouri in the Grant Township near Log Creek. They were: James Welker (brother-in-law to David), Eller, and John W. Stoker (David's brothers). (Vital statistics indicate other family members were in this area, but no land records have been located at this time.)...
      The next notable record of David and his family are found in the 'Redress Petition' to the United States government on behalf of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This petition listed all those who lost property and effects due to the "Mormon Expulsion" order given by the governor of Missouri. This order simply stated that all of the Mormon church people had to immediately leave or die. Groups of raiding parties against the church members ensured the order was carried out to the extreme. The Stokers and their relatives reported that these 'mobs' had stolen their plow, wagons, tools, mill wheel, beehives, pigs, and horses. Their furniture was damaged, guns and rifles taken, and crops and homes were burned. There are 36 family members listed on the petition. ('History of the Church,' Vol 4)
      The following is one journal recounts how volatile the Log Creek area became: "A sketch that I was an eye witness to in the State of Missourie Charles C. Rich on the 24th of October 1838 Messengers Come into Farwest stating that the mob was on Log Creek burning houses and Loaded waggons and threatening the lives of the people those was a few men Sent out to ascertain the movements of the mob these men returned a bout eleven O clock at night Stating that thare had been considerable Damage Done and also that they had taken three of the Brethern prisoners and intended to kill them..." (Stoker 1993).
      David's nephew and the son of Polly Stoker Graybill, recorded this time also: "I went with my father's family and others, to Caldwell County, Missouri, in the autumn of 1837, and was with the Saints there in their time of terrible trials. We planted a crop which we were never allowed to harvest. I was a member of the State Militia under Colonel Hinkle. The mob came upon us near Farr West, in October, 1838... for weeks they had been stealing and driving off our stock, taking a team of horses from my father, and all the horses I owned" (ibid).
      By 1840 the Missouri Governor's expulsion order had forced every member of the church to leave their homes, many fled into Illinois for safety. David's father, Michael, died during this event. One family tradition is that he was buried in the "Saint's Cemetery" in Far West. (There have been no records found as to when and where he died or is buried.)...
      Other church members fled into Adams County, Illinois as the local citizens promised them safety. David, his brothers, and brother in law found work on farms south of Columbus, Illinois.
      The 1840 census records for Adams County, list David, his son John, and their extended families. After taking time to restock and restore, the Stoker families moved further west as did the body of their church; into the state of Illinois. Their prophet and leader, Joseph Smith sent word to all church members to gather in and around the town of Commerce, Hancock County, Illinois where they could homestead new land and start over. It was a piece of swamp land on the bend of the Mississippi River heavily infested with disease carrying insects. The people drained the swamp land and built a city that housed thousands of church members. The name of Commerce was changed to Nauvoo. Tax and historical records of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints show that some of the Stoker families settled a few miles south of the city of Nauvoo...
      David's brother, Eller Stoker, owned land along the "Carthage road" between the cities of Nauvoo and Carthage. Most of the family members settled in the Bear Creek Township twenty miles south of Nauvoo. (Historical Records, Nauvoo, Illinois)
      County historical records list "Bear Creek" as the name of a city, township, and river but all names encompass the same area. Bear Creek was used as a timber and corn producing area.
      Today corn and soybean farms still cover all of the prairie flats with old trees growing along the water ways. Bear Creek is itself a slow moving creek; with steep banks in places giving indications of the water power the creek can have in flood stages. Residents of the farm town of Basco, Hancock County, Illinois still refer to this area as Bear Creek.
      Basco's official records begin in 1876. Today Bear Creek city and towns are only a remnant of it's former size as the settler's descendants are forced to move out to the larger towns to earn a living.
      Early Church references to Bear Creek are:
      1. Missionary town where the Saints lived among non-Mormons included Carthage, Bear Creek, La Harpe, and Fountain Green. ('Historical Atlas of Mormonism,' p.56)
      2. Went to Bear creek, visited the Saints, held meeting, and preached on the subject of the building of the Nauvoo House and temple;... (Watson p.131)
      3. Went to Knowlton Settlement on Bear Creek... (Watson p.160)
      [Picture, pg. 67: "Log Creek Today. This is the general area of what would have been some of the Stoker families holdings. Located south of Kingston, Missouri."]
      [Picture, pg. 67: "Trees in the background line Log Creek today. Except for the creek all is farm land."]
      The Final Expulsion Order
      Religious persecutions again plagued the fledgling church. During the winter of 1846, the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints were again asked to leave. Peaceably at first, but eventually they were driven out in the same fashion as from Missouri. Members were forced to leave their newly built homes and anything they could not put in the wagons or carry. This time they fled across the Mississippi River into the unknown Iowa territory. Mormon journals from the residents living in Bear Creek record the trials they went through. Mobs were again burning homes to force the Saints to leave even though they were not fully prepared for a journey.
      The Bear Creek region is close to the town of Warsaw, Illinois, a place where these mobs could gather and/or flee for safety. Listed below are journal entries from people who lived in the Bear Creek area. I have included this information to give the reader a sense of what the Stoker families endured.
      1. "...On reaching a point midway (between Warsaw and Carthage) they were informed of new depredation by the mob. The sheriff then sent his family to Nauvoo under a small guard and proceeded to the scene of the mobbers. The mobbers saw them coming and took a flight, the posse pursuing with orders to arrest them if possible, if not to fire upon them. After pursuing them for some distance the posses fired upon them and killed two, and wounded it is believed others. This was on Bear Creek about two o'clock this afternoon." (Hosea Stout p39, 40)
      2. "On Saturday, the 5th inst., as Pres. Joseph Smith was on his return from Quincy, to which place he had accompanied Pres. Hyrum Smith and William Law, on their mission to the East, he was arrested, at the Bear Creek Hotel,..." (Times and Seasons, Vol 2., p447)
      3. "...I made ginger beer to sell this summer and I tended the Nauvoo House meat market, good guard, etc. until the 1st of September [1845] and then there began to be trouble in the regions of Bear Creek, Carthage and Warsaw, so that we had to fly to arms again to protect ourselves against the mob..." (Allen Stout p.23)
      4. "July harvested my wheat, which was on ground rented of Mr. Ezra Chase. It was very heavy, but owing to the heavy rains all summer, there was not so good a yield as was expected. During the fall and shortly after harvest, there were a great many buildings burned in the southern part of the county, belonging to the brethren on Bear Creek and Morely settlements. I went on one or two expeditions to repel the burners. To go through a thickly settled portion of country and see where had stood houses, barns, stacks, but now burned to the ground and some tragedies enacted amongst a nation claiming to have attained to the height of civilization. I was not surprised nor grieved to hear that the mob had said that we must, as a people, leave the ensuing spring, as soon as grass grew and water runs and that the authorities of our church had assented to these proposals." (Lorenzo Brown Journal BYU-S p.10)
      5. "This is the number as usually stated, Gregg says: "For a week the burning continued until the whole of Morley-Town was in ashes, with many other residences in the Bear Creek region and that of Green Plains. In all it is stated that as Many as 100 or 125 houses were burned and their occupants driven off." (History of Hancock County p.340)
      6. "In a very few days afterwards, bands of organized mobbers commenced the work of burning our houses in Yelrom, Green Plains and Bear Creek settlements, and throughout the country." (George Albert Smith p.22)
      7. "Governor Ford puts the number at 175, houses and hovel that were burnt the inmates having to flee for their lives." (History of Illinois p.407)
      Between 1847 and 1857 there were at least twelve family members that passed away. Included were: David Stoker who died on the 27 May 1852, his brother: John W. Stoker and his wife Electa Sarah McDaniel, David's brother, Eller Stoker, Michael Graybill (Mary's (Polly) husband), three children of Jacob Stoker and Catherine Burcham, two of John W. Stoker and Electa Sarah McDaniel, and two children of Michael Jr. and Martha McDaniel. It is believed that they with many others are buried in the family cemetery on the east edge of Council Bluffs...
      William and his wife, Almira Winger, settled in Spanish Fork, Utah."

      7. A partial quote from the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT, from an article entitled: "Michael Stoker":
      "Michael Stoker, b. Feb. 10, 1805; m. Martha Carr McDaniels.
      Michael was 10 years old when the family went to Ohio. It was there he met and married Martha Carr McDaniels on January 1, 1829. Martha was the daughter of James and Zibiah McCarly McDaniels and was born in Ohio on Feb. 24, 1808. The third son born to Michael and Martha in July of 1834, they named William Moroni, and that is the first date I have of a Mormon name in the Stoker family.
      Michael Stoker Jr. has the following names and dates in his journal. "The names of the members who were baptized by me in February, 1836. Baptized James Toinbuson and ordained him an elder. Then in Oct., 1836 baptized William Stoker and Barbara Stoker. Then in April, 1837, baptized Margaret Judd, David Eller, Tabitha Eller, Mary Sharp, Rhoda Judd."
      Rhoda Judd was the mother of Margaret and Tabitha. David Eller was the first cousin to Michael and two years later Margaret married Michael's younger brother Eller Stoker.
      By noting where the children were born, one can trace the whereabouts of their journeys. By August of 1837, they were in Caldwell County, Missouri. They were at Trader's Point in Pottawattamie County, Iowa in January of 1849 and lived there the rest of their lives. Michael died on March 30, 1858 at the age of 53, and Martha died 15 years later.
      Trader's Point, an early Indian trading center, was south of Council Bluffs and across the river from Sarpy's Ferry. When the Missouri River changed it's course, Trader's Point ended up on the Nebraska side."

      BIOGRAPHY:
      1. Cannon, Donald Q., Author, Book "Far West Record, Minutes of the Church of Jesus Christ of LDS, 1830-1844," Deseret Book Co, 1983, p.291 (biographical appendix): "Michael Stoker (1805-?), the son of Michael Stoker and Ana Barbara, was born in North Carolina. He married Martha McDavid." This appears wrong because these listed parents are grandparents in Petersen genealogy. On page 228, Michael is also listed as an arbitrator giving testimony of the original Branch court case in an appeal court case before the High Council of 1 Jun 1844 in Nauvoo between Moses Daily vs Conference of Highland Branch.

      2. "Individual Affidavits from the LDS Historical Department" from the book "Mormon Redress Petitions, Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict," editor Clark V. Johnson, p.359: "Stoker, Michael: Illenois adams county may 11th 1839, the following is my bill of Damage against State of missouri in 183[8]
      viz pre emption with improve ment, $100.00
      Loss in stock fifty Dollars, 50.00
      Deeded Land and Rifle gun forty three Doll, 43.00
      hogs and cattle and house hold furniture and crop of corn
      and other vegetable seventy five Dollars, 75.00
      time lost and Moving Expences, 100.00
      thre hundred and eighteen Dol.Total sum, $318.00
      Michael Stoker [Sworn to before W. Oglesby, J.P., Adams Co., IL, 11 May 1839.]"

      3. The book "Mormon Redress Petitions, Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict," edited by Clark V. Johnson, contains a copy of the "Scroll Petition" dated 28 Nov 1843 at Nauvoo, IL addressed to the U.S. Congress by members of the LDS Church who had property destroyed by Missouri mobs in the 1830's. Included with over a couple thousand signatures are those of Michael and Martha Stoker and their son "Gabrael".

      4. Per records provided by the Nauvoo Visitor's Association:
      a. Seventies' records, Index, 70s Bk B Sel, pg. 259; Quorum Q26, ordained May 6, 1839 at Quincy, Illinois.
      b. Other sources:
      i. RLDS Name Authority Card Catalog.
      ii. Far West Record by Don Cannon, p. 291.
      iii. Nauvoo: Early Mormon...Series 1839-46. Platt, Lyman. 1980.
      iv. Susan Black, Early LDS Members Rec 41:916.
      v. Index, Nauvoo Land and Record Files 570.
      vi. Pottawattamie County Census.
      vii. Early Church File.
      c. Civil data: Nauvoo; Centerville, IA.
      d. Property in Nauvoo area was T4 R8 (Wythe). See file for land map. Area is two miles south from Nuvoo and slightly southwest of Carthage in Hancock County.

      5. May have been a magistrate in Hancock County, IL judging from this entry: FHL book 977.343-V2m "Marriage Index of Hancock County, IL, 1829-1849," by Tri-county Genealogical Society, 1983, vol. 1, p. 24, marriage license no. 153: "Wilford Hudson and Juliane Graybill, 29 Nov 1842, by Michael Stoker, MG." The bride would have been Michael's niece.

      6. Mentioned in the book "The Howard Leytham Stoker Von Dollen Family Histories," FHL 929.273 H833a, by Doris Lewis, 2017 So. 80th Ave., Omaha, Nebraska, 68124:
      P. 87: Michael Stoker, the son of (John) Michael Stoker, was a 28 year old bachelor in Wilkes County, NC when the US census was taken in 1790. The farm which Michael Stoker bought from John Dick was on the north fork of New River in Ashe County. (The boundary line had been changed from Wilkes.) In 1792 Michael married Catherine Eller, the oldest daughter of Peter Eller and Elizabeth Dick. The Ellers and Dicks were settlers in this same area and all of Michael and Catherine's children, except Eller, were born and raised among numerous family members in North Carolina. In 1815, the family joined a migration of relatives moving west into Ohio. This party of Graybills and Stokers, all ages from babies to the elderly crossed the border into Ohio on Christmas Day, 1815. Michael and his son David, who had just turned 21, took part in the first election held in Jackson County on April 1, 1816. John Michael Stoker, Michael's father, settled in Perry County, Ohio, about 60 miles north. While in Ohio the Stokers became members of the newly organized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. In 1837 [error: Feb 1836?], Michael, Jr., who was now a man and a member of the Priesthood, baptized Eller's future wife and her mother, Margaret and Rhoda Judd. Pauline Stoker of Council Bluffs has Michael Jr.'s old notebook where he kept records of baptisms, birthdays and deaths. On October 27, 1836, Michael and Catherine Stoker sold their land in preparation of the move to Missouri where the Saints were gathering. Michael was then 74 and Catherine 63 years old. Great persecutions took place in Missouri during the next two years and the family had to flee to Illinois for safety. Michael was not among those who reached Illinois, and how or when he died is not known. Catherine was at Nauvoo, IL, when the Saints again had to flee in February of 1846. She settled in Pottawattamie County, living with her eldest daughter, Polly, where she died. She is buried in the Stoker-Graybill Cemetery east of Council Bluffs, Iowa."
      Pp. 92, 93; note that David Eller is the son of John Eller who in turn is brother to both Catherine and Mary Eller: "Michael Stoker, b. 10 Feb 1805, m. Martha Carr McDaniels. Michael was 10 years old when the family went to Ohio. It was there he met and married Martha Carr McDaniels on Jan. 1, 1829. Martha was the daughter of James and Zibiah McCarley McDaniels and was born in Ohio on Feb. 24, 1808. The third son born to Michael and Martha in July of 1834, they named William Moroni, and that is the first date I have of a Mormon name in the Stoker family. Michael Stoker Jr. had the following names and dates in his journal. 'The names of the members who were baptized by me in February, 1836. Baptized James Toinbuson and ordained him an elder. Then in Oct., 1836 baptized William Stoker and Barbara Stoker. Then in April, 1837, baptized Margaret Judd, David Eller, Tabitha Eller, Mary Sharp, Rhoda Judd.' Rhoda Judd was the mother of Margaret and Tabitha. David Eller was the first cousin to Michael and two years later Margaret married Michael's younger brother Eller Stoker. By noting where the children were born, one can trace the whereabouts of their journeys. By August of 1837, they were in Caldwell County, Missouri. They were at Trader's Point in Pottawattamie County, Iowa in January of 1849 and lived there the rest of their lives, Michael died on March 30, 1858 at the age of 53, and Martha died 15 years later. Trader's Point, an early Indian trading center, was south of Council Bluffs and across the river from Sarpy's Ferry. When the Missouri River changed its course, Trader's Point ended up on the Nebraska side. Michael Stoker's Journal: 'One of the Elders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
      Michael Stoker, Jr. was born Feb. 10, 1805 in the State of North Carolina.
      Martha Carr McDaniel was born Feb. 24, 1808 in the state of Ohio.
      Gabriel Mc N. Stoker was born Oct. 23, 1829 in Bloomfield Township, Jackson County, Ohio, Friday at 3 P.M.
      David N. Stoker was born Friday, Feb 2nd, 1832 at 10 P.M. in Bloomfield Township, Jackson Co., Ohio.
      William Moroni Stoker was born July 10, 183, Friday at 7 A.M. in Bloomfield Township, Jackson County, Ohio.
      John A. Stoker was born Wednesday, August 23, 1837 at Long Creek, Caldwell County, Missouri.
      Michael James Stoker was born Saturday, May 23rd, 1840 at 9 A.M. in Columbus, Hancock County, Illinois.
      Jared Samuel Stoker was born March 19, 1843 on Sunday at 3 o'clock p.m. At Bear Creek, Hancock County, Illinois.
      Joseph Jehiel Stoker was born April 26, 1846 near Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Ill.
      Martha Rebecca Stoker was born January 1, 1849 at Trader's Point, Pottawattamie County, Iowa.
      David N. Stoker died at 9:30 o'clock p.m., May 14, 1852 at Trader's Point, Pottawattamie Co., Iowa.
      David [should be Gabriel; typo?] McNiel Stoker died May 23, 1852, at Trader's Point, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. (They would have been 20 and 23 years old, and died nine days apart.)
      Michael Stoker Jr. (the father) died March 30, 1858, at Trader's Point.
      Martha Rebecca Stoker, Thursday, Oct. 19, 1871 at 2:30 A.M. at Trader's Point, Pottawattamie County, Iowa.
      Martha Carr Stoker died Tuesday, Febrauary 4, 1873 at 2:30 A.M. at Trader's Point, Pottawattamie County, Iowa'
      [Not in journal but in Doris' book;] William Moroni Stoker died at the age of 95 in Union City, Oregon.
      Jared Samuel Stoker died Dec. 6, 1912, Union, Oregon."

      7. Part of the Stoker family group mentioned in sister Polly (Stoker) Graybill's biography in the FHL book 929.273 P684pn: "Graybill/Stoker/Eller/Smith/Koons/Pitt Connections," by Norman E. 'Gene' Pitt, 1996, pp. 17-24, note that this book has a considerable downline of the children of this couple: "Michael Peter Graybill, b. 14 May 1787, Jefferson, Wilkes Co. (now Ashe Co.), NC; d. 24 Sep 1856, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie Co., IA; bur. in the Graybill-Stoker Pioneer Cemetery; Pottawattamie Co,., IA; md. 1811, Ashe Co., NC to Mary 'Polly' Stoker. Michael was the s/o John Peter Graybill and Christena Wampler. Polly was b. 24 Nov 1792, Ashe Co. [Wilkes], NC; d. 18 Feb 1864, Pottawattamie Co., IA; bur. in the Graybill-Stoker Pioneer Cemetery. She was the eldest child of Michael Stoker and Catherine Eller... Michael and Polly left North Carolina probably in early 1816, and settled in Bloomfield Twp., Jackson Co., OH. Michael's parents, Peter Sr. and Christena (Wampler) Graybill, accompanied them; also, Michael's brother Henry and sister Barbara who had married Polly's brother David Stoker. Polly's parents, Michael and Catherine (Eller) Stoker, and other Stokers also made the journey with them. [Also John Graybill?] In the early 1830's, the family was visited by Missionary John Fisher from Bloomfield Twp. and was introduced to the early Latter Day Saints church. Those who were old enough were baptized in 1833. Involved in the church, Michael Graybill Sr. and related families anxiously followed the news from Independence, MO. The wanted to gather with the Saints in Caldwell Co., MO to be part of Zion, the new Jerusalem. Michael sold his farm to his father, Peter Graybill Sr., who along with Henry, Michaels' brother, and sister Celia (Graybill) Henson, decided to stay in OH. In 1836, Michael and other relatives packed to make the trip to Far West, MO. They spent the winter with Stoker relatives in Monroe Co., IN, then arrived at Far West in September 1837. The family withstood the dangers and aggravations of mob attacks. They endured many hardships. They had their plows, wagons and horses taken and even their first crop was taken just before it was harvested. With no provisions of food for the coming winter, Michael's sons, Simeon and Levi, left to look for work. They found jobs chopping railroad ties for the Eastern Railroad in Hannibal, MO. But they were unable to collect their pay until the following spring of 1839, when they were allowed to take the amount of their earnings out in goods. This allowed them to obtain wagons and horses and move the related families to Quincy and Nauvoo, IL. Michael Sr. and his family, Simeon's family and Catherine (Eller) Stoker's lived eleven miles southeast of Quincy, IL. After the death of Joseph and Hyrum Smith in 1844, Simeon went to Nauvoo to help guard the secretly hidden bodies of Joseph and Hyrum. Fearful that the anti-Mormon mob might try to do further violence to Joseph's and Hyrum's bodies, their caskets were filled with sand for the public burial. By 1846, most of Nauvoo had been vacated. Michael Sr.'s and Levi's families had gone west and settled in Kanesville, now Council Bluffs, IA. Some of the related families went on to UT. Michael Sr.'s daughters, Juliana and Mary Ann, were among those who went to UT. Michael Sr.'s sister Barbara (Graybill) Stoker went to UT later. Michael's and Polly's children were David, Catherine, Simeon Peter, Joseph Levi, George Washington, William Lenore, Juliann or (Julia Ann?) Michael S., Jr., Mary Ann, Elizabeth, Sidney Rigdon and Christina."

      8. FHL film 702: "Journal of John Stoker, b. 1817; Journal starts November 1, 1869." John was the son of David Stoker and Barbara Graybill. The first 35 pages detail his mission taken from Utah to Virginia and Tennessee through Council Bluffs, Iowa, which I have summarized and included with his notes in this database. Pp. 36-227, the balance of John's journal, are genealogical notations of family. Many pages are blank. Besides family, the journal also notes many other unrelated Stokers who were probably gleaned from books and other sources. It appears as if maybe his son David may have taken over the book later. Many entries are repetitive at different times. Pertinent data for this family or individual is quoted verbatim as follows on pages:
      98: Michael Stoker/Catherine Eller, born Mar. 9, 1773 [the 9 is overwritten over the 6]. Children:
      Polly Stoker, born Nov. 24, 1792, died Feb. 7, 1864.
      David Stoker, born Mar. 23, 1795, died May 27, 1852.
      Elizabeth Stoker, born Feb. 28, 1800.
      John W. Stoker, born May 16, 1803, died Aug. 2, 1857.
      Michael Stoker, Jr., born Feb. 10, 1805.
      Rebecca Stoker, born Mar. 19, 1807.
      Catherine Stoker, born July 19, 1809.
      Jacob Stoker, born April 7, 1812.
      Eller Stoker/Margaret, born July 28, 1816, died July 18, 1855.
      101: Catherine Eller, wife of Michael Stoker born Mar. 6th 1773.
      John W. Stoker, son of above parents, born Mar. 16, 1803, died Aug. 2, 1857.
      David Stoker was born 23 March 1795, died May 27, 1852.
      Polly Stoker (Graybill), born Nov. 24, 1792, died Feb 7, 1864.
      Michael Stoker, born July 10, 1805.
      Jacob Stoker, born April 7, 1812.
      Eller Stoker, born July 28, 1815, July 18, 1855.
      Elizabeth Stoker (Walker), born Feb 28, 1800.
      106-107: Michael Stoker, born Feb. 10, 1805, North Carolina, married Martha McDaniel - father was James McDaniel, mother was Zibiah McCarley. Children:
      Gabriel McNeel Stoker, born Oct. 23, 1829, Jackson Co., Bloomfield, Ohio.
      David Newbury Stoker, born July 2, 1832, Bloomfield, Jac. Co., Ohio.
      John A. Stoker, born Aug 25, 1837, Colewill Co.
      Michael James Stoker, born May 23, 1840, Columbus, Ill.
      Jared Samuel, born Mar. 19, 1843 Hancock Co., Ill.
      Joseph J. Stoker, born April 20, 1845, Hancock Co., Ill.
      Martha Rebecca Stoker, born Jan. 1 1849 Potawatamie Co., Iowa, died Oct. 9, 1871.
      180-181: Catherine Stoker, daughter of Peter Eller and Elizabeth was born March the 9th, 1773 in the State of North Carolina, Rowan County.
      Jacob Stoker, son of Michael Stoker and Catherine Eller was born April 7th, 1812, Ashe County, State of North Carolina.
      Michael Graybill, son of Peter Graybill and Christenia Wampler was born May 1787, North Carolina, Ash County.
      Eller Stoker, son of Michael Stoker and Katherine Eller was born July 28th, 1816, Ohio, Jackson Co., Bloomfield Township, died July 18, 1855.
      Margaret Judd Stoker, daughter of John Judd and Rhoda Shepherd was born May 29th, 1822, North Carolina, Wilks County.
      Michael Stoker, son of Michael Stoker and Katherine Eller was born Feby 10th, 1805, North Carolina, Ash Co.

      9. The following is a partial quote from an article entitled: "The Michael and Catherine Eller Stoker family as early Mormons in Ohio and Missouri," by Jimmie "B" Stoker, November 24, 1993, as reprinted in the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT. See the notes of Michael Stoker (1762-1838) for the full transcript of this article:
      "The Stokers join the LDS Church.
      Mormon missionaries come.
      During the fall of 1833 Michael Stoker (1762-1838) and his family, living in Bloomfield Township, Jackson County, Ohio first heard the preaching of the missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. These missionaries exhorted them to join the new church and told them about Joseph Smith receiving inspired revelations from God. In addition the Church was noted for its new scripture, the Book of Mormon.
      The Stokers were drawn to the message. Many accepted baptism before the end of 1833. They included sixteen-year-old John Stoker (1817-1881) who was baptized November 13, 1833 by Seymour Brunson(1) and four days later his double cousin, fifteen-year-old Joseph Levi Graybill, who was baptized by John A. Fisher.(2) These two grandsons of Michael Stoker (1762-1838) were among the first of the Stoker family to embrace the new church.
      In 1834 Seymour Brunson moved his family to Bloomfield and organized a branch of the Church.(3) John's parents, David (1795-1852) and Barbara Graybill Stoker, joined the branch during that year. David's younger brother, Michael, Jr., (1805-1858) was affiliated with the Mormons. Evidence of his affiliation with the church comes from the fact that his son, born on July 10, 1834 was named, "William Moroni." Clearly the name Moroni marked Michael as having read the Book of Mormon. Moreover, in his journal Michael, Jr., writes, "The names of the members who were baptized by me in February, 1836. Baptized James Toinbuson and ordained him an elder." He also baptized William and Barbara Stoker that year.(4) Michael held the Mormon priesthood to officiate in these ordinances. The Stokers and their relatives were very enthusiastic about their new church. They contributed to its growth and sustained its leadership.
      The McDaniel connection.
      The children and grandchildren of MIchael Stoker (1762-1838) had an affinity to marry the children of James McDaniel and Zibiah McCarley, neighbors in Jackson County. John W. Stoker (1802-1857) married Electa Sarah McDaniel (1806-1857) on April 19, 1827. Michael Stoker, Jr., (1805-1858) married her sister, Martha Carr McDaniel, on Jan 1, 1829. A grandson, John Stoker (1817-1881), and a granddaughter, Christine Stoker (1815-1854), children of David Stoker (1795-1852), married Jane McDaniel (1810-1890) on January 21, 1836 and John Riley McDaniel on February 8, 1835. Nineteen-year-old John, in addition to marrying Jane, also adopted her son, Alma. Family tradition says that Alma's father would not consider joining the LDS church so Jane left him. About a month after her son's birth, Jane married John Stoker, the nephew of her two brothers-in-law.
      The Kirtland Temple is dedicated.
      In the spring of 1836, some members of the Bloomfield branch made the 200 mile trip north to Kirtland, Ohio to attend the dedication of the temple. In that group was Michael Stoker's son-in-law and grandson, Michael Graybill, Sr., and Joseph Levi Graybill. Michael Graybill's wife, Polly Stoker (1792-1864), was expecting the birth of her eleventh Child, a son who was born April 6, 1836. She didn't go with them. Michael Graybill while at the conference and temple dedication at Kirtland was impressed by Sidney Rigdon's two and a half hour sermon. Upon returning to Bloomfield, he named his newly born son, Sidney Rigdon Graybill.(5)
      Picture p. 3: "Barbara Graybill and her son, John Stoker...
      During the late fall and winter of 1836, the Stoker families, whether together or separately, trekked across Ohio in their wagons. Many of them planned to spend part of the winter with relatives in Indiana.(7) Michael stopped in Henry County, Indiana where on December 1, 1836 he bought "1 Roe of Shock corn" from the estate of Absalom Koons who was Catherine's deceased nephew.(8) Michael's son Michael Stoker, Jr., must have been in Henry County when he wrote in his journal in April 1837 that he baptized Margaret Judd, David Eller, Tabitha Eller, Mary Sharp, Rhoda Judd. These were relatives and soon-to-be relatives. Margaret Judd in 1839, after the Stokers were driven from Missouri, would marry Michael's youngest brother, Eller. Rhoda Judd was the mother of Margaret Judd and Tabitha Eller. David Eller was Michael's first cousin.(9)
      Footnotes
      1. "The Life of John Stoker," compiled by Eunice Stoker Southwick
      2. "Early Members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints," Vol. III G.K. compiled by Susan Easton Black. Provo: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1993. p. 149.
      3. "Seymour Brunson," LDS Biographical Encyclopedia Vol. 3 compiled by Andrew Jenson. Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Co., 1901. p. 331.
      4. "The Howard, Leytham, Stoker, Von Dollen Family Histories and including the Bell, Teeple, Mackland, Bardsley, Graybill, Eller, Dick, Oman, Smith, and Koons Families," compiled by Doris Lewis, 2017 So. 80th Avenue, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. p. 92.
      Footnotes:
      5. Vivian Graybill, "Michael Graybill, Sr." Typescript sent to Jim Stoker by Alice Graybill Russell, 6120 Wincanton Dr., Shreveport, LA 71129 on October 6, 1993.
      6. Ibid.
      7. Ibid.
      8. A necessary explanation on the Michael Stoker (Stocker) family group sheet sent by Jim Rose, 740 So.Woodland Hills Dr., Woodland Hills, UT, 84 653 on Nov. 13, 1993.
      9. "The Howard Leytham, Stoker, Von Dollen Family Histories...," p. 92."

      10. Partial transcription from an article entitled "Michael Stoker and Catherine Eller." from the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT. See notes of Michael Stoker for full transcription of this article:
      "During the Adams County time period some of the Stoker men found work with a farmer named Coleman Wilkes. Mr. Wilkes lived approximately two miles southeast of Columbus, Ohio. He had first offered work and a home to Elizabeth's husband, James Welker, and soon after David, John W., Michael, and Jacob also obtained work with him. Here they labored diligently trying to earn enough to rebuild their supplies and stock which they had lost during the Missouri struggles.
      Moving to Bear Creek, Hancock Co., Illinois
      On July 1, 1839 the Mormon church's prophet and leader, Joseph Smith, called for all church members to settle in and around the Commerce, Illinois area. The town of Commerce was renamed by the church members to Nauvoo. In 1842 the Stoker family had complied. Packing up their belongings they moved north settling their families around the Carthage/Bear Creek area. James Welker's son, John, recorded: "...he found that there was land that could be entered in Hancock County, about 15 miles south of Nauvoo. He moved there and filed on a homestead. Part of it was prairie land and part was timber. He built a large hewed two roomed log house. Then the next thing was to fence and make a farm to make a living off of" (Ibid).
      The 1842 personal property tax assessment book of Hancock County has records for Stoker, Welker, and Graybill families living within the county. These records indicate the possibility that they lived outside of the cities."
      Building the Nauvoo Temple
      The Stoker families were on hand for the building of the temple for their church. It is recorded in the church history that Eller Stoker, Jacob Stoker, and John McDaniel (husband to Christine Stoker) worked on the temple for a period of time. All families were expected to donate time and supplies to the temple project...
      Life was beginning to flourish again for the families, and happy times were with them. On May 23, 1844 Joseph Levi Graybill, Eller Stoker, and Michael Stoker were initiated and passed into the Nauvoo Lodge of Masons. Two weeks later Levi Graybill, Eller Stoker, and Michael Stoker became lodge members, and on June 8th they were raised to Master Masons. While in Illinois, John Stoker, John W. Stoker, John Welker Eller Stoker, and Jacob Stoker were given church callings of Office of the Seventy.
      Death of Joseph and Hyrum Smith
      Living around Carthage the Stoker, Graybill, and McDaniel families were homesteading lands close to those who most violently disagreed with the Mormons and who were constantly calling for their removal. Sometimes these men formed their own vigilante groups trying to scare the Mormons into leaving. Some of the Stoker men folk were called into military duty within the State Militia as recorded in the history of John McDaniel.
      "Early on June 24, Joseph and Hyrum Smith, John Taylor, and fifteen other members of the Nauvoo city council headed to Carthage to answer the charges filed against them. They passed the home of William Stoker located six miles southeast of Nauvoo on the Carthage Road before 8 A.M.... Sometime after noon, the Stokers saw the mounted riders traveling toward Nauvoo. Arriving at their destination at 2:30, the leaders gathered three small cannons and about two hundred firearms which were turned over to the militia. At nearly midnight the militia delivered the Mormon leaders who came voluntarily to the authorities in Carthage... Thursday June 27 Joseph and his brother Hyrum, were martyred. A mob of about one hundred men with blackened faces gathered about five 'clock in the afternoon. Several stormed the jail where the Smith brothers and a few friends were sequestered. Joseph and Hyrum were shot dead, and John Taylor wounded...the assassins and their comrades fled Carthage to Warsaw and then sought refuge west of the MIssissippi River... Friday June 28, with the bodies of the slain leaders placed in two different wagons, covered with branches to shade them from the hot sun, Willard Richards, Samuel Smith, and Artois Hamilton pulled out of Carthage and headed for Nauvoo. Sometimes shortly after noon, the procession with eight soldiers passed by William Stoker's driving teams pulling the two wagons containing the bodies of the martyrs. Mary Stoker Aitken, a granddaughter of WIlliam Stoker and Almira Winegar, wrote, "My father [John Stephen Stoker] told us that his parents had told him that they had seen the bodies of the Prophet and his brother Hyrum Smith, being taken from Carthage to Nauvoo." ...One of the Stoker relative's narrative mentions that "After the deaths of Joseph and Hyrum in 1844, Simeon Graybill went up to Nauvoo to help guard the secretly hidden bodies of Joseph and Hyrum. Fearful the anti-Mormon mob might try to do further violence to Joseph and Hyrum's bodies, their caskets were filled with sand for public burial" (Ibid).
      Conflict/Harassment Again.
      In 1845 the mobbing and burnings began, starting with the outlying settlements. The Stokers were living within the church area called the Highland branch of Illinois. The babies, weddings, and all manner of social life continued on and in July the families were doing more temple work for their ancestors. Again the families grew; new events were attended to. Jacob and John Stoker also joined the Masons and were later raised to Master Masons.
      Sheriff of Hancock County ordered the saints to organize and protect themselves. "John Welker tells how he and his cousins mutually watched out for each other. His account follows: 'The mob (against) the Latter-day Saints was increasing and I but a boy of 18 was the oldest of the boys that was at hoe. My oldest brother was married and doing for himself. I was the one to look after the family after my father died and when the burning out of the later day Saints by the mob commenced close by I was in a settlement 10 miles for whare {sic} they were burning houses and some of my cousins and relative lived close to whare {sic} I lived. We got together and agreed to take turnes {sic} and watch the mob and do the best we could to protect our homes. Some one was out every night watching their movements. They did not come to our little settlement to burn us out, if they had come some of them would have been hurt. Thare {sic} is many things connected with this I will not write.' (Punctuation added.)
      Not all of the Stoker relatives were as fortunate as the Welkers, John McDaniel and his wife Christine Stoker, according to one history, "...were greatly persecuted with the other saints and several times were driven out by the mobs. On one occasion they were attacked and forced to flee with a child under each arm while their home was burned" (Ibid).
      Nauvoo Temple Dedicated.
      In late 1845 the church's Nauvoo Temple was dedicated and many of the saints came to the temple to perform their own religious (endowment) ordinances. Between January 5 and January 21, of 1846 sixteen heads of the Stoker clan had received their own temple endowment.
      Michael Stoker Jr. and Catherine Burcham
      Jacob Stoker and Martha Carr McDaniel
      Eller Stoker and Margaret Judd
      Catherine Eller Stoker (widow)
      Elizabeth Stoker Welker (widow)
      James W. Welker and Anna Pugh
      John Stoker and Jane McDaniel
      John W. Stoker and Sara McDaniel
      William Stoker and Almira Winegar
      Records from the Nauvoo temple show that the Stoker family participated in other religious temple activities: Catherine Eller Stoker, Michael Stoker (son), Eller Stoker (son) and wife Margaret (Judd) Stoker (Eller's wife), James Welker and wife Elizabeth Stoker Welker, and Mary (Polly) Stoker (Graybill) all did baptisms by proxy for their deceased relatives."

      11. The following is a partial quote from an article entitled: "The Michael and Catherine Eller Stoker family as early Mormons in Ohio and Missouri," by Jimmie "B" Stoker, November 24, 1993, as reprinted in the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT. See the notes of Michael Stoker (1762-1838) for the full transcript of this article:
      "Stokers arrive in Missouri.
      As early as July 7, 1837 the Stokers had filed three forty acre deeds to land 7 or 8 miles southeast of Far West in the Grant Township near Log Creek which flowed north and emptied into Shoal Creek. Eller, Michael's unmarried son, has 40 acres listed in his name.(12) Kitty-cornered to the southwest was a forty-acre tract in his older brother, John W. Stoker's name. Directly west of Eller's holdings are 40 acres deeded to his brother-in-law, James Walker [Welker]. They may have actually lived on their farms earlier in the spring to clear it and get a first year's crop in the ground.
      There's reason to believe that Michael Stoker (1762-1838) and Catherine Eller (1773-after 1850) were living with their youngest son because the worth of Eller's holdings are reported as nearly doubled his brother, John W. Stoker (1802-1857) who had a family of five at the time. John W. said he also had "a right for preemption improvement and crop in clinton county..." Their brother Michael Stoker, Jr. also must have lived nearby because his son, John Alexander Stoker was born on Long Creek [Log Creek], Caldwell County, Missouri on August 23, 1837. Michael, Jr., although not shown as holding a deed on the County records, indicated in his sworn affidavit on May 11, 1839 that he had held land in Missouri. David Stoker and his family were somewhere near Far West. Michael and Polly Stoker Graybill didn't arrive in Far West until September 1837.(13)...
      Picture: "Stokers' and Welker's land in Grant Twp., Caldwell Co." (Shows forty acre holdings of Orin Porter Rockwell [one section away], forty acre holding of James Walker [Welker][at southeast corner of N.E. quarter of section 8], forty acre holding of Eller Stoker [at southwest corner of N.W. quarter of section 9], and forty acre holding of John W. Stoker [at northeast corner of S.W. quarter of section 8].) [The latter three all touch.]
      War erupts...
      War and plunder hit the Stokers.
      The Stoker brothers holdings were located about one mile southeast of land deeded to Orin Porter Rockwell. The involvement of Orin Porter Rockwell in the Danites, may have been one reason that the mob torched this part of the county in 1838 during the attempt to drive the Mormons from the state. Interestingly enough, in Charles C. Rich's account of the Mormon-Missouri conflict in 1838, the following is stated.
      "A sketch that I was an eye witness to in the State of Missourie Charles C. Rich on the 24th of october 1838 Messengers Come into Farwest stating that the mob was on Log creek burning houses and Loaded waggons and threatening the lives of the people those was a few men Sent out to ascertain the movements of the mob these men returned a bout eleven O Clock at night Stateing that thare had been considerable Damage Done and also that they had taken three of the Brethren prisoners and intended to kill them that night the trumpet was Sounded and men com together an prepard for to march in haste in persuit of the mob that we might Deliver our Brethren out of their hands we raised all the men we Could till we got to Braggs on Logg Creek where we organised them in to...a company and found we had about Seventy five men David W Patten was first in Command and Charles C. Rich Second..."(15)
      The pursuit continued into Ray County where the Battle of Crooked River was fought. David Patten was killed. Needless to say, the Stoker brothers, Eller, John W., and Michael, Jr., and others of the family was involved. Their nephew, Joseph Levi Graybill, Polly Stoker Graybill's son in a statement made when he was an old man, says,
      "I went with my father's family and others, to Caldwell County, Missouri, in the autumn of 1837, and was with the Saints there in the time of their terrible trials. We planted a crop there in the spring of 1838, which we were never permitted to harvest. I was a member of the State MIlitia under Colonel Hinkle. The mob came upon us near Far West, in October, 1838...for weeks they had been stealing and driving off our stock, taking a team of horses from my father, and all the horses I owned. When the mob came up on us first they demanded Joseph Smith, parley Pratt, Sidney Rigdon, Lyman Wight and George W. Robinson appear in camp. Colonel Hinkle surrendered these men, telling us that these Missourians wanted to have a talk with them. Imagine our surprise when we were informed that these men were prisoners...and would be shot the next morning at 9 o'clock at Far West."(16)
      The Stoker family members endured many hardships. They had their plows, wagons, tools, mill wheel, beehives, pigs and horses stolen. Their furniture was damaged. Guns and rifles were taken. Joseph Levi Graybill's brother, Simeon, suffered also, but when his personal and prized saddle horse was stolen, he reportedly became so angry he had to repent.(17)
      Picture p. 7: "William Stoker and Almira Winegar."
      Picture p. 8: "The Stoker family trail from Ohio to Illinois (1836-1839)."
      Michael Stoker dies.
      In spite of the terrors of the mob, Michael Stoker (1762-1838) may have seen his grandson, William Stoker (1819-1892), David's son, marry Almira Winegar that October 1838 in Far West before he died. The privation and stress of the situation was too much for Michael in his old age. He is believed to have died at Far West and to be buried in the Saints Cemetery there during the strife.
      The Missourians call the shots.
      As the Missourians gained the upper-hand, they gave the Mormons the ultimatum to be out of Missouri by the spring of 1839. Thousands of Mormons were faced with very bleak prospects. Some were being hunted for supposed crimes during the conflict. Others were just trying to find food and shelter for their families. It was a dreary scene in which Nancy Stoker (1838-1920), a granddaughter of Michael Stoker (1762-1838) and first daughter of Jacob, was born on December 21, 1838.
      The young men of the Stoker family were out looking for work and the means by which to support their dispossessed families. Simeon and Levi Graybill, the sons of Polly Stoker, sought work along the Mississippi River. As Levi says, "I left Far West just before Christmas, 1838, arriving at Hannibal, Missouri on Christmas Day. I chopped cord wood and split rails near Hannibal for the purpose of getting money to help my father's family away from Missouri, but when I came to settle I had to take my pay out of the store, so I was compelled to trudge back through the snow over 200 miles. I secured a team to take my father's family to Illinois in the spring of 1839."(18)
      The Stokers leave Missouri
      Leaving her husband, Michael, buried in Missouri, Catherine Eller Stoker (1773-after 1850) and her large family, helped each other, left Far West, Missouri and joined the hundreds of Saints who were on the road heading east to Illinois at the time. Little is known about the Stoker family's journey other than Joseph Levi Graybill's account of securing a team and taking his father's family to Illinois. There is some question if Alexander and Catherine Stoker Lackey and their four children were with the Stokers. A great granddaughter says they stayed in Missouri only a year.(19) The Lackey family would not follow the saints to Illinois, but would return to Jackson County, Ohio.
      Some of the Graybill documents indicate that Catherine Eller Stoker lived with her oldest daughter, Polly Stoker Graybill, in Illinois and Iowa. There's a great possibility that she was living with them at the time of the Missouri exodus. The ordinary trip took between ten and elven days. One personal traveling westward at the time said he encountered over two hundred wagons between the Mississippi River and Far West.(20) Arriving at the Mississippi River, the refugees probably crossed over on the ice if they came in the late winter, but as those arriving in the spring had to wait their turn to be ferried across...
      The following members of Michael Stoker's family attached their names to a petition in 1843 that they had lived in Missouri and had been driven from their state:(21)
      David Stoker [Michael's son David (1795-1852)], John Stoker [possibly David's son, John (1817-1881) or Michael's son, John W. (1803-1857)], John McDaniels (1812-1884) [David's son-in-law, husband of his oldest daughter, Christine (1815-1854)], Elles Stoker (1816-1855) [Eller, Michael's youngest son], Mary Stoker (1822-1890) [probably Margaret Judd, Eller's wife]. Catharine Stoker (1773-after 1850) [Michael's wife, Catharine Eller], Jacob Stoker (1812-1893) [Michael's son], Catharine Stoker [Catharine Burcham, Jacob's wife], John Stoker (1803-1857) [Michael's son, John W. Stoker], Sarah Stoker (1806-1857) [John W. Stoker's wife, Electa Sarah McDaniel].
      Geo. Graybill (1821-?) [Michael's grandson, George Washington Graybill, son of Polly Mary Stoker (1792-1864)], Michael Stoker (1805-1858) [Michael's son], Martha Stoker (1808-1873) [Martha Carr McDaniel, wife of Michael's son, Michael], Gabrael Stoker (1832-1852) [Michael's grandson, son of Michael (1805-1858)], William Stoker (1819-1892) [Michael's grandson, son of David], Almira Stoker (1818-1884) [Michael's granddaughter-in-law, grandson, William's wife, Almira Winegar], Samuel D. Stoker (1840-1908) [Michael's great-grandson, son of William and Almira], William Stoker (1842-1906) [Michael's great-grandson, son of William and Almira].
      Mary Graybill [possibly Michael's daughter, Polly Mary Stoker (1792-1864) or his granddaughter, Mary Ann Graybill (1830-?)], William Graybill (1825-1880) [Michael's grandson, son of Polly Mary Stoker], Adam Graybill [still looking for this relationship to Michael], Sidney R Graybill (1836-?) [Michael's grandson, son of Polly Mary Stoker], Levi Graybill (1818-1912) [Michael's grandson, son of Polly Mary Stoker], Patience Graybill (1825-1895) [Patience Smith, Michael's granddaughter-in-law, wife of Joseph Levi Graybill (1818-1912)], Mary Graybill [possibly Michael's daughter, Polly Mary Stoker (1792-1864), or his granddaughter, Mary Ann Graybill (1830-?), Polly's daughter].
      John Stoker (1817-1881) [Michael's grandson, son of David], Jane Stoker (1810-1890) [Michael's granddaughter-in-law, Jane McDaniel, wife of John (1817-1881)], Hannah Graybill [Michael's great granddaughter, daughter of Joseph Levi Graybill], Hyrum Stoker (1840-1887) [Michael's great grandson, son of John Stoker (1817-1881) and Jane McDaniel], Alma Stoker (1835-1897) [Michael's adopted great grandson, son of Jane McDaniel], and Franklin Stoker (1842-1855) [Michael's great grandson, son of John Stoker (1817-1881)]. Lucinda Stoker is also listed on the petition but cannot establish a relationship to Michael Stoker (1762-1838).(22)
      Refuge found in Illinois.
      The people of Quincy reached out to help the Mormons fleeing from Missouri. Elizabeth Haven Barlow writes, "The people of Quincy had contributed between four and five hundred dollars for the poor Mormons. God