Levi Graybill

Male 1818 - 1912  (94 years)


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  • Name Levi Graybill 
    Born 12 Mar 1818  Bloomfield Township, Jackson, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 30 Nov 1912  near Persia, Harrison, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 3 Dec 1912  Mormon Cemetery, Grove Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I346  Petersen-de Lanskoy
    Last Modified 1 Sep 2015 

    Father Michael Peter Graybill,   b. 14 May 1787, , Wilkes (now Ashe), North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Sep 1856, Kanesville (now Council Bluffs), Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years) 
    Mother Mary or Polly Stoker,   b. 24 Nov 1792, , Wilkes (now Ashe), North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Feb 1864, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Married May 1811  Jefferson, Ashe, North Carolina, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F249  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Patience Smith,   b. 25 Nov 1825, New Castle, Henry, Indiana, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Aug 1895, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years) 
    Married 20/21 Jun 1841  Quincy, Adams, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Abigail Graybill,   b. 15 Apr 1842, , Hancock, Illinois, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Apr 1865, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years)
     2. Salathiel Graybill,   b. 26 Nov 1846, , Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Apr 1917, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     3. Patience Elizabeth Graybill,   b. 29 Dec 1848, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jan 1934, Persia, Harrison, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
     4. Levi Graybill,   b. 16 Aug 1851, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 May 1879, of Grove Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 27 years)
     5. John Arno Graybill,   b. 28 Apr 1853, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1930, of Crescent, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 78 years)
     6. Michael Graybill,   b. Abt 1855, Macedonia Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1860, Macedonia Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 4 years)
     7. Sidney Graybill,   b. 27 Jan 1855, Kane Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Feb 1855, Kane Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     8. David Graybill,   b. 30 Mar 1855, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Nov 1857, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
     9. Joseph Bird Graybill,   b. 14 Aug 1857, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Oct 1880, of Grove Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 23 years)
     10. George A. Graybill,   b. 23 Dec 1859, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Nov 1880, of Grove Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 20 years)
     11. Mary Ellen Graybill,   b. 26 Sep 1862, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jan 1948, Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
     12. Martha A. Graybill,   b. 26 Oct 1864, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Nov 1881, Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 17 years)
     13. William Sidney Graybill,   b. 16 Nov 1867, Wheeler's Grove, Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 May 1931, Grant Township, Sherman, Kansas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2015 
    Family ID F243  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • RESEARCH_NOTES:
      1. Reviewed 6 May 2002 Rootsweb.com Worldconnect.

      2. Last name may also be reported as Grabell but he reports it in his published testimony as Graybill. Ancestral file reports first name as Joseph Levi whereas his published testimony reports only Levi. I use Levi short of better documentation otherwise.

      3. Censuses:
      1820 US: Bloomfield Township, Jackson, Ohio, pg. 195, township had a little over 40 families; related families include James Lackey, Michael Stoker, and Michael Graybill. In neighboring Madison Township, related families David Stoker, Peter Graybill, Nancy (Graybill) Henson, and James McDaniel are found. Columns are male 0-10, 10-16, 16-18, 16-26, 26-45, 45+// female 0-10, 10-16, 16-26, 26-45, 45+:
      Michael Stoker: 2,1,0,1,0,1//1,1,0,1,0.
      Michael Graybill: 3,0,0,0,1,0//1,0,0,1,0. [Appears to be Michael, his wife Polly, and their children David, Catherine, Simeon and Levi.]
      James Lackey: 2,2,1,2,0,1//1,2,1,1,5.

      1830 US: Bloomfield Township, Jackson, Ohio, pg. 109-112, note whole township had 527 people living in it, related families include Michael Stoker, Michael Stoker Jr., Alexander Lackey, James Welker, Michael Graybill, and John Stoker:
      Michael Graybill. Males 0-5:1; 5-10:2; 10-15:2; 15-20:1 40-50:1. Females 0-5:1; 15-20:1; 30-40:1. [Appears to Michael, his wife Polly, and their children David, Catherine, Simeon, Levi, George, William, Juliana, and Michael.]

      1850 US: Cannot find even though Levi in his biography says he was in Iowa by 1846. Did a page by page search of Decatur and Pottawattamie Counties which in 1850 appear to be larger than they are now. They possibly could have lived away from the others in an area that may not have received a census taker.

      1851 Iowa State: Pottawattamie County. FHL film 1022203. The entire state was counted but only Pottawattamie listed everyone by name in the household and their ages; other counties only listed the head of the household and a numerical count without names of the various ages by sex in the household. No date is given when the census was taken but it was certified in Dec. 1851; however, the other counties show a Sep 1851 date which also appears more likely for Pottawattamie as well in light of ages given some children with known birthdays in October. Census return:
      Grabill: Levi [can't read age - 33?], Patience 25, Abigail 9, Selathiel 4, Patience 2, Levi infant. [Note that the following related families are in this census and very close neighbors: Simeon P. Graybill, Michael/Polly Graybill with Polly's mother Catherine Eller Stoker, Eller/Margaret Stoker, Jacob/Catherine Stoker, Philip/Catherine Gatrost, David/Barbara Stoker, Edward/Sarah Davis, and William/Almira Stoker. Other relatives in same county but separated by several pages of census include the following families: Thomas/Hannah Pilling whose daughter Hannah, later marries William Lenore Graybill, Levi/Patience Graybill, John W./Sarah Stoker, Hannah Ford whose son Martin later marries Zibiah M. Stoker, and John/Sarah Smith.]

      1852 Iowa: the census has Levi Grabell in Indianstown, Pottawattamie, IA, p. 21. This census is statistical and only lists head of household with numbers of males, females, and voters. It is not very helpful for families or positively identifying a given individual. The following Stokers are shown as being in the same area: David, Eller, Jacob, John, and William as well as Michael Graybill, Martin Ford, Philip Gatrost, John Smith, George Graybill, and Levi Graybill.

      1854 Iowa: Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, FHL film 1022207. Next door neighbors include Levi Graybill and John Smith. Census return:
      Levi Graybill, 4 males, 3 female, 1 voter, 1 militia, 7 total.

      1856 Iowa: (From Ancestry.com) Macedonia, Pottawattamie, Iowa, p. 2 of 4:
      Levi Grabill, 38, 10 years in Iowa, OH, farmer.
      Patience, 31, 10, IN.
      Abbigail, 14, 10, IL.
      Selatha, 9, 9, IL.
      Patience, 7, 7, IL.
      Levi, 5, 5, IL.
      John, 3, 3, IL.
      Michael, 1, 1, IL.

      1860 US: Macedonia P.O., Grove Twp., Pottawattamie, Iowa, p. 416, entry 847, next door neighbors to Stephen Smith and Peter Frame [husband of Lydia Smith]:
      Levi Graybill, 42, farmer, Ireland.
      Patience, 36, IN.
      Abigail, 18, IL.
      Salathiel, 13, IA.
      Patience, 11, IA.
      Levi, 8, IA.
      John, 6, IA.
      Joseph B., 3, IA.
      George W., 5/12, IA.

      1870 US: Wheeler's Grove P.O., Grove Twp., Pottawattamie, Iowa, p. 160a, dwelling 34 [note a couple of households away is son Salathiel, brother-in-law Stephen Smith, and Sarah Winegar Smith]:
      Levi Graybill, 52, farming, $3000, $1000, OH.
      Patience, 44, housekeeping, IN.
      Palmer, 21, farmer, IA.
      Levi, 19, IA.
      John, 17, IA.
      Joseph, 12, IA.
      George, 10, IA.
      Mary, 7, IA.
      Martha, 6, IA.
      Wm., 2, IA.
      Lucinda Prichet, 7, IA.

      1880 US: Grove, Pottawattamie, Iowa; NA film T9-0361, p. 128D:
      Levi Graybill, farmer, self, 62, OH NC NC.
      Patience, wife, 55, IN SC NC.
      Bird, son, 22, IA OH IN. [LDS site took this off as Bud, but close examination shows Bird.]
      Geo., son, 20, IA OH IN.
      Mary, dau., 17, IA OH IN.
      Martha, dau, 15, IA OH IN.
      Lucinda Pritchett, g.dau., 16, IA OH IN.
      Will, son, 12, IA OH IN.

      1895 Iowa: Cass, Harrison, Iowa:
      Levi Graybill, 76, OH.
      Patience, 69, IN.

      1900 US: Boomer Twp., Pottawattamie, Iowa, p. 17B:
      John Graybill, Apr 1853, 47, m. 20 years, IA OH IN, farmer.
      Fanny, wife, Aug 1850, 39, m. 20 years, 10 children with 5 living, IA Unk NY.
      Amos, son, Nov 1884, 15, IA IA IA.
      Leslie, son, Aug 1887, 14, IA IA IA.
      Elba, son, Sep 1888, 11, IA IA IA.
      Vena, dau., May 1894, 5, IA IA IA.
      Neva, dau., May 1899, 1, IA IA IA.
      Levi, father, Mar 1818, 82, widower, OH NC NC.

      1910 US: Grove Township, Pottawattamie, Iowa, p. 74b, entry 84:
      Mary Mercer, 46, widow, 4 total children all living, IA OH IN.
      Pearl, 12, son, IA MO IA.
      Glee, 9, granddau., IA Unk IA.
      Levi Graybill, fther, 92, widower, OH Ger NC.

      4. 12 Jul 2002 email from Ron Romig, Archivist, RLDS Church in Independence, Missouri:
      A. "I tracked the reference to History of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, vol. 3: 324 - The following-named persons were baptized by Elder William H. Kelley: Stephen Smith, E. W. Knapp, James Otto, E. F. Hyde, and P. E. Knapp. Early Reorganization Minutes, Book A (of membership records) adds: Stephen Smith was confirmed by E. C. Briggs and W. Baldwin, citing Herald vol. 4 (1863):28."
      B. "October RLDS Conference, 1859, held at the barn of Israel L. Rogers in Kendall Co., Ill. April 9th A.M. Conference met. Bro Beebe, delegate from the Farm Creek Branch in Mill's Co. Iowa presented the following report: "Organization of the Farm Creek Branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of L.D.S. of Mill co. Iowa. Were organized on the 16th of Oct. 1859 by giving in their names as follows: Calvin Beebe, Mrs. Submit Beebe, John Smith, Sariah Smith, John Richards, Harriet Richards, Richard Y. Kelly, Sariah E. F. Kelley, Levi Graybill, Patience Graybill, Elxander Liles, Frances M. Liles, Calvin A. Beebe{e}, Angeline C. Beebe, Joseph Smith, Rachel Smith, Stephen Smith, William H. Kelley <1>(this day was rebaptized) Henry Winegar, Mrs. Frances L [Page 63] Richards, Mrs. Elizabeth Winegar, Mrs. Ann Strong, Sariah A. Flesher, Mrs. Alice Osler, after which they chose Calvin Beebe, President; John Smith, Priest; Richard Y. Kelly, Deacon. Early Minutes of the Reorganization, 62-63."
      "I leave it to you to resolve the contradictory baptismal dates for the mentioned Stephen Smiths."

      5. Possible other unproven children for Levi and Patience:
      A. John P. Fisher, a descendant of Henry Fisher, notes in the PAF file accompanying his 3 Jul 2003 email to me that there may be two children Lafayette and David that I do not have. I do not add because he only sketchily shows five children total with no information on any of them. I include this note here just in case I find alternate information supporting the two additional boys.
      B. FHL book 929.273 P684pn: "Graybill/Stoker/Eller/Smith/Koons/Pitt Connections," by Norman E. 'Gene' Pitt, 1996, pp. 55-60, indicates a daughter Hannah Graybill, b. Nauvoo, IL between Abigail and Salathiel and a son Palmer Graybill, b. abt 1849 between Patience E. and John Arno. This information is presented very sketchily without any documentation and I am not sure I trust it yet. The 1851 census certainly shows an age gap between Abigail and Salathiel; however, Patience and Levi are too close age wise in my opinion. In further tracking down of Palmer, the name only shows up as a farmer aged 21 living in the household in the 1870 US census. This census does not include relationships. Upon close scrutiny the P in Palmer is actually an S and the scribbling after the S is debatable but does look something like "almer." No other census or source shows a Palmer and the 1870 census Palmer would perhaps seem like a poor spelling of Salathiel; however, just a few entries later we find Salathiel and his wife in a separate household. The name Palmer Graybill continues to be a mystery.

      6. A partial quote from the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT, from an article entitled: "Polly Stoker":
      "Vivian Graybill, of Independence, Missouri, has worked on the Graybill genealogy for many years and since he plans to publish a book with a great amount of detailed information I will not list the names of their complete families. I will note the names of Michael and Polly's children and how they relate to other families in this book. I do have most family names if anyone wants to check it. [Kerry's note: the author lists each child and grandchild of Polly. See her file for the complete listing. I include only the immediate family in this individual's note.]
      "Joseph Levi Graybill, b. 3/12/1818, Jackson Co., Ohio. m. 3rd cousin Patience Smith. Levi and Patience settled Wheeler's Grove with George Graybill and his wife Mary Smith, sister to Patience.
      1. Salathiel Graybill
      2. Lafayette Graybill
      3. David Graybill
      4. John Graybill
      5. Patience Graybill m. Sidney Pitt"
      [Kerry's note: the list is apparently not accurate since it doesn't show all children of this couple.]

      7. The book "Mormon Redress Petitions, Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict," edited by Clark V. Johnson, contains a copy of the "Scroll Petition" dated 28 Nov 1843 at Nauvoo, IL addressed to the U.S. Congress by members of the LDS Church who had property destroyed by Missouri mobs in the 1830's. Included with over a couple thousand signatures are those of Levi and Patience Graybill.

      8. Per FHL book 977.77 H2b "Settlers of Western Iowa of Council Bluffs, Macedonia, Wheelers Grove..." which is a few pages of oral history transcribed 29 Mar 1936 from an interview with Mr. Frank Shinn. He recounts: "I will tell you who were the first white settlers here. There was Levi Graybill, he came with Brigham Young, and was the first settler anywhere around here. And John Winegar and Uncle John Smith. Those three were the first... Then there was Milton Pitt, who was a politician; he was Speaker of the House of Representatives and was a state senator. Milton Pitt married the daughter of Levi Graybill. She is alive yet, or was the last I heard..."

      9. FHL film 934962, items 3 and 4, "History of Pottawattamie County, Iowa," by Field and Reed, 1907, pg. 197:
      "Grove Township... Many of these early settlers left Nauvoo intending to go to Utah, but for one reason or another they paused here and finally concluded to remain and few, if any, have had cause to regret it. The first to organize a religious body in the township were the Latter Day Saints. E.W. Briggs and W.W. Blair were the organizers, and the original members were John Smith and wife, E.W. Knapp and wife, A.J. Field and wife, James Otto and wife, Levi Graybill and wife, John Winegar and wife, Joseph Smith and wife, and Stephen Smith. John Smith was their first president and E.W. Knapp the first clerk. Services were held at residences of the different members and later at schoolhouses, but the society becoming more numerous and wealthy, in 1874 they erected a modest church building at a cost of $763. The membership had increased until in 1881 it had reached ninety and maintained a regular Sabbath School."

      10. FHL book 929.273 P684pn: "Graybill/Stoker/Eller/Smith/Koons/Pitt Connections," by Norman E. 'Gene' Pitt, 1996, pp. 16-24, 55-60, note that book contains extensive downline of this individual:
      "Joseph Levi Graybill, b. 12 Mar 1818, Bloomfield Twp., Jackson Co., OH; d. 30 Nov 1912, Macedonia, Pottawattamie Co., IA; bur. in the Mormon Trail Cemetery, Macedonia, IA; md. 20/21 Jun 1841, Nauvoo, IL to Patience Smith. Levi was the s/o Michael Graybill and Mary 'Polly' Stoker. Patience was b. 25 Nov 1825, Henry Co., IN; d. 14 Aug 1895, Macedonia, IA; bur. in the Mormon Trail Cemetery, Macedonia, IA. She was the d/o John Smith and Massie Koons. Levi and Patience were second cousins, the great-grandchildren of Peter Eller. They had two children while they lived in Illinois. In the spring of 1846, they moved with neighbors and relatives westward. In 1847, Levi found a waterfall on the Nishnabotna River, near Old Macedonia and filed a squatter's notice on the property, built a log cabin, then collected his wife and children who were staying in the Kanesville area. Salathiel was a new baby. Later the family moved to Wheeler's Grove. In 1886, Levi and Patience accompanied their youngest son, William, and his new wife, Alda Jane Osler, to Cheyenne Co., KS. After building a sod house on the claim, Levi and Patience returned to Iowa, but William stayed and raised a family. Levi, in his later years, planted and grafted peach and apple orchards wherever relatives allowed. He had a great skill with the grafting of trees and also developed a very smooth white potato which he called the Graybill Potato. He told tales about his adventures in the mission field in TN and about other early church happenings. He was much loved by the youngsters in 'Old Brushhollow', who looked forward with relish to his visits..." [Note: Levi's own testimony gives place of marriage as Quincy, Adams, Illinois area and not Nauvoo as this author reports.]
      Also mentioned on pp. 17-24: "In the early 1830's, the family was visited by Missionary John Fisher from Bloomfield Twp. and was introduced to the early Latter Day Saints church. Those who were old enough were baptized in 1833. Involved in the church, Michael Graybill Sr. and related families anxiously followed the news from Independence, MO. The wanted to gather with the Saints in Caldwell Co., MO to be part of Zion, the new Jerusalem. Michael sold his farm to his father, Peter Graybill Sr., who along with Henry, Michaels' brother, and sister Celia (Graybill) Henson, decided to stay in OH. In 1836, Michael and other relatives packed to make the trip to Far West, MO. They spent the winter with Stoker relatives in Monroe Co., IN, then arrived at Far West in September 1837. The family withstood the dangers and aggravations of mob attacks. They endured many hardships. They had their plows, wagons and horses taken and even their first crop was taken just before it was harvested. With no provisions of food for the coming winter, Michael's sons, Simeon and Levi, left to look for work. They found jobs chopping railroad ties for the Eastern Railroad in Hannibal, MO. But they were unable to collect their pay until the following spring of 1839, when they were allowed to take the amount of their earnings out in goods. This allowed them to obtain wagons and horses and move the related families to Quincy and Nauvoo, IL. Michael Sr. and his family, Simeon's family and Catherine (Eller) Stoker's lived eleven miles southeast of Quincy, IL. After the death of Joseph and Hyrum Smith in 1844, Simeon went to Nauvoo to help guard the secretly hidden bodies of Joseph and Hyrum. Fearful that the anti-Mormon mob might try to do further violence to Joseph's and Hyrum's bodies, their caskets were filled with sand for the public burial. By 1846, most of Nauvoo had been vacated. Michael Sr.'s and Levi's families had gone west and settled in Kanesville, now Council Bluffs, IA. Some of the related families went on to UT. Michael Sr.'s daughters, Juliana and Mary Ann, were among those who went to UT. Michael Sr.'s sister Barbara (Graybill) Stoker went to UT later..."

      11. Nauvoo LDS Land and Records Office research file (copy in my possession as of 2 Jun 2007) provides the following information (also partially viewable at www.earlylds.com):
      A. Property:
      T4 R7, (no section listed)
      B. 70s Record (listed under name Joseph Levi Graybill): Quorums Q3 and Q14; baptized RLDS 1859, RLDS Mission to Kentucky and Tennessee.
      C. Partial quote from Susan Black's RLDS memberships: "Joseph Levi Graybill was baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 17 (18) Nov. 1833 by John A. Fisher. He was ordained an elder in 1836 at Jackson Co., Ohio. He moved to Caldwell County, Missouri, in 1837 and served in eh State Militia under Colonel Hinkle. He was ordained a seventy on 3 May 1839 by Joseph Young, Josiah Butterfield, and J. Herriman. Levi moved to Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, in 1845 and received his patriarchal blessing from Hyrum Smith. He received his endowment on 22 Jan 184 in the Nauvoo Temple. Joseph moved to Pottawattamie Co., Iowa, in 1846. He was baptized a member of the RLDS Church on 6 Aug 1861 (1859) by W.W. Blair. He served a mission in 1865 to Kentucky and Tennessee. Sources:
      Early Reorganization Minutes, 1852-1871, Book A., pp. 62, 646-47.
      Early Reorganization Minutes, 1872-1905, Book C.
      "The History of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints," pp. 423, 439-40.
      Saints' Herald Obituaries, 1913, p. 295.
      Zion's Ensign Obituaries, 24:12:7.
      Black, "Membership of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: 1830-1848; 18:973.
      Nauvoo Temple Endowment Register, 1845-46.
      Temple Index Bureau.
      Journal of History, 4:1:104-10; 10:168-202.
      Knisley's Biographical Dictionary.
      RLDS Authority Card Catalog
      Biographical Index, RLDS Card Catalog
      Joseph Smith's Memoirs.
      D. Misc. Comment, source unknown: "Levi and Patience had two children while they lived in Ill. In the spring of 1846 they moved with fellow Saints westward. In 1847 Levi found a waterfall on the Nishnabotna River near Old Macedonia and filed a squatter's notice on the property, built a log cabin, then collected his wife and children staying in the Kanesville area; Salathiel was a new baby. Later the family moved to Wheelers Grove. In 1886 Levi and Patience accompanied their youngest son, William and his new wife Alda Jane Osler, to Cheyenne County, Kansas. After building a sod house on the claim, Levi and Patience returned to Iowa, but William and Alda stayed and raised a family. Levi and Patience were second cousins, they were g.grandchildren of Peter Eller."
      E. "Our Family History Dating Back as Far as 1748," by Vivian Graybill: Graybill is a German name which probably means "dweller near a ditch." There are thirteen ways of spelling Graybill, Grabeel, Graybeal, Grabiel, Grabel, etc. the first spelling being Krehenbuth, is of Swiss origin. Christian Graybill, which is five generations back from Mary Ellen Graybill Mercer, was the first settler of our family coming from England, as Mennonites driven to Germany, Holland and England. (According to Mrs. Duvall of Walkerville, Maryland, she says the family history shows that Christian Graybeal was married to the daughter of King George III of England, whose name was Mary. She forsake the Church of England to become a Tundker, she had taken her money and rigged up a ship and went on to buy ten more ships.)
      Christian Graybeal's grandson, Peter Graybill, Sr. married Cristena Wampler, daughter of Peter and Barbara Wampler in 1780. Cristena, along with her little sister and a neighbor Child, was captured by the Delaware Indians and kept captive for seven years. The Indians were good to them and raised them as their own. When an exchange of prisoners took place, great Grandpa Wampler didn't know the children until Cristena sang her mother's lullaby. There is more to this story.
      One of the writers, Florence Wilson of Omaha, now deceased, refers to our ancestor, Conrad Grebel, connected with the early Ana Baptist people (before Mennonites) in Switzerland, as early as 1526. Conrad Grebel was born in the late 1400's, and according to Florence Wilson can be traced as far back as Ceasar Augustus, Conrad Grebel's descendants John and Christian Graybill, came over on the "Friendship" in 1727, leaving Rotterdam in 1726, landing in Philadelphia and later moved south.
      The Mennonites people in their historic preservation of Graybill records at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, have confirmed to us as late as July 1975, what several of our writers from coast to coast have offered as evidence of our early Graybill ancestors for several years. Twas a gratifying experience and brought joy to our souls and when things are clear and we don't have to guess, or suppose, or conjecture, the experience is very rewarding.
      [missing pages] ...north and one mile west of the present RLDS church.
      The families withstood the dangers and aggravations on mob attacks. They endured many hardships. They had their plows, wagons and horses taken and even their first crop was taken just before it was harvested. Simeon could take what he had to, but when his personal and prized saddle horse was taken, he reportedly became so angry he had to repent.
      With no provisions of food for the winter, Simeon and Levi left to look for work. They found jobs chopping railroad ties for the Eastern Railroad in Hannibal, Missouri. But they were unable to collect pay until the following spring of 1839 when they were allowed to take the amount of their earnings out in goods. This allowed them to obtain wagons and horses and move the related families to Quincy and Nauvoo, Illinois.
      Levi Graybill, who had married Patience Smith, lived in Nauvoo, Illinois. They received their Patriarchal Blessings from patriarch Hyrum Smith. The patriarch's office was one door west of Joseph Smith's red brick store. Levi went to Quincy to bring Polly and her mother, Catherine Eller Stoker to Nauvoo, for their Patriarchal Blessing from Hyrum Smith.
      Michael Sr. and his family, Catherine Eller Stoker and Simeon's family lived eleven miles southeast of Quincy, Illinois. After the deaths of Joseph and Hyrum Smith in 1844, Simeon Graybill went up to Nauvoo to help guard the secretly hidden bodies of Joseph and Hyrum. Fearful the anti-Mormon mob might try to do further violence to Joseph and Hyrum's bodies, their caskets were filled with sand for the public burial.
      By 1846 most of Nauvoo had been vacated. Michael Sr. and Levi's families had gone west and settled in Kanesville, now Council Bluffs, Iowa. Some of the related families went to Utah. Michael Sr.'s daughters, Julianna and Mary Ann went to Utah. Michael Sr.'s sister, Barbara Graybill Stoker went to Utah later.
      Simeon's wife Amanda Hill, died in 1848. Simeon's brother David and his wife Mahala Hill Graybill had both died. And Simeon's daughter Rachel, at ten years of age, died that same year. Rachel was buried along side her mother and aunt in Illinois. Simeon had three small children, William Ashby, Andrew and Aaron and his brother's young children Meredith, David Jr., Amanda and Almeda. In Dec. of 1848, Simeon took all seven small children by wagon to Kanesville, now Council Bluffs, Iowa. He stopped off shortly at Winterset, Iowa along the way. Simeon purchased 327 acres in old Brushollow, which joined his father's land on the west. Michael Sr. owned land three miles north of the old cemetery our family history association now maintains.
      Between Michael Sr.'s land and the old cemetery, the old "North Star" Branch log church was built on the bank close to Little Mosquito Creek This was 1/4 mile south of Gilliat on the Great [copy ends]."

      12. Nauvoo LDS Land and Records Office research file (copy in my possession as of 2 Jun 2007) provides the following information (also partially viewable at www.earlylds.com): Seventies Records (those ordained before 1850), LDS Archives:
      "George W. Graybill, b. 26 Jun (1821); hoil, age 24 in 1845, parent Michael; residence City of Joseph (Nauvoo); Source: 70s rec, 29 Qrm, Bk B Sel, 1845, LDS Arc, pg. 114.
      Levi Graybill (Greybill), b. 12 Mar 1824 at Jackson, Ohio; age 20 in 1844, parents Michael; residing Nauvoo and Utah; ordained 70 or into Quorum, 6 May 1839, Quincy, Illinois; Source: Journal History, 6 May 1839, from 70s rec A, 6, 70s Rec, 14 Qrm, Bk B Sel, 1845, pg. 46, 1844, LDS Arc, pp. 3-4, 2nd list, 1850s, pp. 19-20.
      Michael Graybill, b. 6 Jul (1828), Ohio; age 17 in 1845; Parent Michael; residence Bear Creek, Illinois; Source: 70s rec, 29 Qrm, Bk B Sel, 1845, LDS Arc, pg. 114.
      William L. Graybill, b. 25 Jan (1823 of 1824); Ohio; age 21 in 1845; parent Michael; residing Bear Creek (Illinois); Source: 70s rec, 29 Qrm, Bk B Sel, 1845, LDS Arc, pg. 114."

      13. The following is a partial quote from an article entitled: "The Michael and Catherine Eller Stoker family as early Mormons in Ohio and Missouri," by Jimmie "B" Stoker, November 24, 1993, as reprinted in the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT. See the notes of Michael Stoker (1762-1838) for the full transcript of this article:
      "The Stokers join the LDS Church.
      Mormon missionaries come.
      During the fall of 1833 Michael Stoker (1762-1838) and his family, living in Bloomfield Township, Jackson County, Ohio first heard the preaching of the missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. These missionaries exhorted them to join the new church and told them about Joseph Smith receiving inspired revelations from God. In addition the Church was noted for its new scripture, the Book of Mormon.
      The Stokers were drawn to the message. Many accepted baptism before the end of 1833. They included sixteen-year-old John Stoker (1817-1881) who was baptized November 13, 1833 by Seymour Brunson(1) and four days later his double cousin, fifteen-year-old Joseph Levi Graybill, who was baptized by John A. Fisher.(2) These two grandsons of Michael Stoker (1762-1838) were among the first of the Stoker family to embrace the new church.
      In 1834 Seymour Brunson moved his family to Bloomfield and organized a branch of the Church.(3) John's parents, David (1795-1852) and Barbara Graybill Stoker, joined the branch during that year. David's younger brother, Michael, Jr., (1805-1858) was affiliated with the Mormons. Evidence of his affiliation with the church comes from the fact that his son, born on July 10, 1834 was named, "William Moroni." Clearly the name Moroni marked Michael as having read the Book of Mormon. Moreover, in his journal Michael, Jr., writes, "The names of the members who were baptized by me in February, 1836. Baptized James Toinbuson and ordained him an elder." He also baptized William and Barbara Stoker that year.(4) Michael held the Mormon priesthood to officiate in these ordinances. The Stokers and their relatives were very enthusiastic about their new church. They contributed to its growth and sustained its leadership.
      The McDaniel connection.
      The children and grandchildren of Michael Stoker (1762-1838) had an affinity to marry the children of James McDaniel and Zibiah McCarley, neighbors in Jackson County. John W. Stoker (1802-1857) married Electa Sarah McDaniel (1806-1857) on April 19, 1827. Michael Stoker, Jr., (1805-1858) married her sister, Martha Carr McDaniel, on Jan 1, 1829. A grandson, John Stoker (1817-1881), and a granddaughter, Christine Stoker (1815-1854), children of David Stoker (1795-1852), married Jane McDaniel (1810-1890) on January 21, 1836 and John Riley McDaniel on February 8, 1835. Nineteen-year-old John, in addition to marrying Jane, also adopted her son, Alma. Family tradition says that Alma's father would not consider joining the LDS church so Jane left him. About a month after her son's birth, Jane married John Stoker, the nephew of her two brothers-in-law.
      The Kirtland Temple is dedicated.
      In the spring of 1836, some members of the Bloomfield branch made the 200 mile trip north to Kirtland, Ohio to attend the dedication of the temple. In that group was Michael Stoker's son-in-law and grandson, Michael Graybill, Sr., and Joseph Levi Graybill. Michael Graybill's wife, Polly Stoker (1792-1864), was expecting the birth of her eleventh Child, a son who was born April 6, 1836. She didn't go with them. Michael Graybill while at the conference and temple dedication at Kirtland was impressed by Sidney Rigdon's two and a half hour sermon. Upon returning to Bloomfield, he named his newly born son, Sidney Rigdon Graybill.(5)
      Picture p. 3: "Barbara Graybill and her son, John Stoker...
      War and plunder hit the Stokers.
      The Stoker brothers holdings were located about one mile southeast of land deeded to Orin Porter Rockwell. The involvement of Orin Porter Rockwell in the Danites, may have been one reason that the mob torched this part of the county in 1838 during the attempt to drive the Mormons from the state. Interestingly enough, in Charles C. Rich's account of the Mormon-Missouri conflict in 1838, the following is stated.
      "A sketch that I was an eye witness to in the State of Missourie Charles C. Rich on the 24th of october 1838 Messengers Come into Farwest stating that the mob was on Log creek burning houses and Loaded waggons and threatening the lives of the people those was a few men Sent out to ascertain the movements of the mob these men returned a bout eleven O Clock at night Stateing that thare had been considerable Damage Done and also that they had taken three of the Brethren prisoners and intended to kill them that night the trumpet was Sounded and men com together an prepard for to march in haste in persuit of the mob that we might Deliver our Brethren out of their hands we raised all the men we Could till we got to Braggs on Logg Creek where we organised them in to...a company and found we had about Seventy five men David W Patten was first in Command and Charles C. Rich Second..."(15)
      The pursuit continued into Ray County where the Battle of Crooked River was fought. David Patten was killed. Needless to say, the Stoker brothers, Eller, John W., and Michael, Jr., and others of the family was involved. Their nephew, Joseph Levi Graybill, Polly Stoker Graybill's son in a statement made when he was an old man, says,
      "I went with my father's family and others, to Caldwell County, Missouri, in the autumn of 1837, and was with the Saints there in the time of their terrible trials. We planted a crop there in the spring of 1838, which we were never permitted to harvest. I was a member of the State Militia under Colonel Hinkle. The mob came upon us near Far West, in October, 1838...for weeks they had been stealing and driving off our stock, taking a team of horses from my father, and all the horses I owned. When the mob came up on us first they demanded Joseph Smith, parley Pratt, Sidney Rigdon, Lyman Wight and George W. Robinson appear in camp. Colonel Hinkle surrendered these men, telling us that these Missourians wanted to have a talk with them. Imagine our surprise when we were informed that these men were prisoners...and would be shot the next morning at 9 o'clock at Far West."(16)
      The Stoker family members endured many hardships. They had their plows, wagons, tools, mill wheel, beehives, pigs and horses stolen. Their furniture was damaged. Guns and rifles were taken. Joseph Levi Graybill's brother, Simeon, suffered also, but when his personal and prized saddle horse was stolen, he reportedly became so angry he had to repent.(17)...
      The Missourians call the shots.
      As the Missourians gained the upper-hand, they gave the Mormons the ultimatum to be out of Missouri by the spring of 1839. Thousands of Mormons were faced with very bleak prospects. Some were being hunted for supposed crimes during the conflict. Others were just trying to find food and shelter for their families. It was a dreary scene in which Nancy Stoker (1838-1920), a granddaughter of Michael Stoker (1762-1838) and first daughter of Jacob, was born on December 21, 1838.
      The young men of the Stoker family were out looking for work and the means by which to support their dispossessed families. Simeon and Levi Graybill, the sons of Polly Stoker, sought work along the Mississippi River. As Levi says, "I left Far West just before Christmas, 1838, arriving at Hannibal, Missouri on Christmas Day. I chopped cord wood and split rails near Hannibal for the purpose of getting money to help my father's family away from Missouri, but when I came to settle I had to take my pay out of the store, so I was compelled to trudge back through the snow over 200 miles. I secured a team to take my father's family to Illinois in the spring of 1839."(18)
      The Stokers leave Missouri
      Leaving her husband, Michael, buried in Missouri, Catherine Eller Stoker (1773-after 1850) and her large family, helped each other, left Far West, Missouri and joined the hundreds of Saints who were on the road heading east to Illinois at the time. Little is known about the Stoker family's journey other than Joseph Levi Graybill's account of securing a team and taking his father's family to Illinois. There is some question if Alexander and Catherine Stoker Lackey and their four children were with the Stokers. A great granddaughter says they stayed in Missouri only a year.(19) The Lackey family would not follow the saints to Illinois, but would return to Jackson County, Ohio..."
      Footnotes
      1. "The Life of John Stoker," compiled by Eunice Stoker Southwick
      2. "Early Members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints," Vol. III G.K. compiled by Susan Easton Black. Provo: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1993. p. 149.
      3. "Seymour Brunson," LDS Biographical Encyclopedia Vol. 3 compiled by Andrew Jenson. Salt Lake City: Andrew Jenson History Co., 1901. p. 331.
      4. "The Howard, Leytham, Stoker, Von Dollen Family Histories and including the Bell, Temple, Mackland, Bardsley, Graybill, Eller, Dick, Oman, Smith, and Koons Families," compiled by Doris Lewis, 2017 So. 80th Avenue, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. p. 92.
      5. Vivian Graybill, "Michael Graybill, Sr." Typescript sent to Jim Stoker by Alice Graybill Russell, 6120 Wincanton Dr., Shreveport, LA 71129 on October 6, 1993.
      12. This land's legal description is the 9th section of Township 55 North Range 28 West of the 5th P.M. as shown in Caldwell Co. Records of Deeds. Original Land entries 1835-1857. [Family History Film #0955376].
      13. Vivian Graybill, "Michael Graybill, Sr."
      14. Stephen C. LeSueur, "The 1838 Mormon War in Missouri." Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 1987. p. 50.
      15. "Mormon Redress Petitions: Documents of the 1833-1838 Missouri Conflict," edited by Clark V. Johnson. Vol. Sixteen in the Religious Studies Center Monograph Series. Provo: Brigham Young University, 1992. p. 707.
      16. Joseph Levi Graybill, "Levi Graybill, Son of Michael and Polly Stoker Graybill" typescript received by Jim Stoker on October 5, 1993 from Alice Graybill Russell, 6120 Wincanton Dr., Shreveport, LA 71129.
      17. Vivian Graybill, "Michael Graybill Sr."
      18. Joseph Levi Graybill, "Testimony at age 92."
      19. Letter from Ethel McCarley to Madeline E. Fletcher dated July 15, 1957.
      20. Richard Neitzel Holzapfel and Jeni Broberg Holzapfel, "Women of Nauvoo," Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1992. p. 11."

      14. The following is a partial quote from an article entitled: "The Michael and Catherine Eller Stoker family as early Mormons in Ohio and Missouri," by Jimmie "B" Stoker, November 24, 1993, as reprinted in the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT. See the notes of Michael Stoker (1762-1838) for the full transcript of this article:
      "The following members of Michael Stoker's family attached their names to a petition in 1843 that they had lived in Missouri and had been driven from their state:(21)
      David Stoker [Michael's son David (1795-1852)], John Stoker [possibly David's son, John (1817-1881) or Michael's son, John W. (1803-1857)], John McDaniels (1812-1884) [David's son-in-law, husband of his oldest daughter, Christine (1815-1854)], Elles Stoker (1816-1855) [Eller, Michael's youngest son], Mary Stoker (1822-1890) [probably Margaret Judd, Eller's wife]. Catharine Stoker (1773-after 1850) [Michael's wife, Catharine Eller], Jacob Stoker (1812-1893) [Michael's son], Catharine Stoker [Catharine Burcham, Jacob's wife], John Stoker (1803-1857) [Michael's son, John W. Stoker], Sarah Stoker (1806-1857) [John W. Stoker's wife, Electa Sarah McDaniel].
      Geo. Graybill (1821-?) [Michael's grandson, George Washington Graybill, son of Polly Mary Stoker (1792-1864)], Michael Stoker (1805-1858) [Michael's son], Martha Stoker (1808-1873) [Martha Carr McDaniel, wife of Michael's son, Michael], Gabrael Stoker (1832-1852) [Michael's grandson, son of Michael (1805-1858)], William Stoker (1819-1892) [Michael's grandson, son of David], Almira Stoker (1818-1884) [Michael's granddaughter-in-law, grandson, William's wife, Almira Winegar], Samuel D. Stoker (1840-1908) [Michael's great-grandson, son of William and Almira], William Stoker (1842-1906) [Michael's great-grandson, son of William and Almira].
      Mary Graybill [possibly Michael's daughter, Polly Mary Stoker (1792-1864) or his granddaughter, Mary Ann Graybill (1830-?)], William Graybill (1825-1880) [Michael's grandson, son of Polly Mary Stoker], Adam Graybill [still looking for this relationship to Michael], Sidney R Graybill (1836-?) [Michael's grandson, son of Polly Mary Stoker], Levi Graybill (1818-1912) [Michael's grandson, son of Polly Mary Stoker], Patience Graybill (1825-1895) [Patience Smith, Michael's granddaughter-in-law, wife of Joseph Levi Graybill (1818-1912)], Mary Graybill [possibly Michael's daughter, Polly Mary Stoker (1792-1864), or his granddaughter, Mary Ann Graybill (1830-?), Polly's daughter].
      John Stoker (1817-1881) [Michael's grandson, son of David], Jane Stoker (1810-1890) [Michael's granddaughter-in-law, Jane McDaniel, wife of John (1817-1881)], Hannah Graybill [Michael's great granddaughter, daughter of Joseph Levi Graybill], Hyrum Stoker (1840-1887) [Michael's great grandson, son of John Stoker (1817-1881) and Jane McDaniel], Alma Stoker (1835-1897) [Michael's adopted great grandson, son of Jane McDaniel], and Franklin Stoker (1842-1855) [Michael's great grandson, son of John Stoker (1817-1881)]. Lucinda Stoker is also listed on the petition but cannot establish a relationship to Michael Stoker (1762-1838).(22)
      Refuge found in Illinois.
      The people of Quincy reached out to help the Mormons fleeing from Missouri. Elizabeth Haven Barlow writes, "The people of Quincy had contributed between four and five hundred dollars for the poor Mormons. God had opened their hearts to receive us. May heaven's blessings rest upon them. We are hungry and they feed us, naked and clothed us. The citizens have assisted beyond all calculations."(23)
      Footnotes
      21. Also included are some of their children who were born after 1838 in Illinois.
      22. "Mormon Redress Petitions," pp. 574, 598, 599-601.
      23. Elizabeth Haven Barlow in letter to Elizabeth Howel Bullard, 24 February 1839, published in Ora H. Barlow, "The Israel Barlow Story and Mormon Mores." Salt Lake City: Ora H. Barlow, 1968."

      15. From an article entitled "The Family" from the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT. For the full transcriptional listing of the descendants of Michael Stoker and Catherine Stoker, see the notes of Michael Stoker - the following only pertains to this immediate family. Generation "1" is Michael Stoker and Catherine Eller:
      "The Michael Stoker Family as existed at the time of his death. Those names that are [bracketed] probably were involved in the Missouri experience...
      2-[Polly Mary Stoker], born on 24 Nov. 1792 in Ashe Co., NC, married [Michael Graybill] (14 May 1787- 24 Sep 1856), son of John Peter Graybill and Christina Wampler, on May 1811 in Jefferson, Ashe Co., NC. She lived in Ashe Co., NC; Jackson Co., OH; Caldwell Co., MO; Adams Co., IL; and Pottawattamie Co. IA. She died 18 Feb 1864 in Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie Co., IA. Both Michael and Polly are buried in the Graybill/Stoker Cemetery.
      3-[David Graybill], born 24 Sept 1812 in Ashe Co., NC, married Mahala Hill. Both died in Illinois. In December 1848 David's brother, Simeon Graybill whose wife, Amanda Hill, had died, took David's children and his own making seven altogether in a wagon to settle in Kanesville, Iowa.
      3-[Catherine Graybill], born 9 Jun 1814 in Ashe Co., NC, married [Philip Gatrost]. Philip and Catherine moved to Missouri with her parents. They built a brick house in Blue Grass Hollow on the edge of her father's land in Pottawattamie Co., IA. She died Dec. 1, 1886 at Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie, IA and is buried in the Graybill/Stoker Cemetery.
      3-[Simeon Peter Graybill], born 26 Mar 1816 in Jackson Co., OH. Reared to manhood on a farm. For a time engaged in mining at Mt. Vernon, OH. Married [Amanda Hill] on 16 Mar 1837 in Jackson Co., OH. They moved to Caldwell Co., MO then to Adams Co., IL where Amanda died on Feb 21, 1848. In the fall of 1848, Simeon moved to a farm in Pottawattamie Co, IA. He married Frances (Graham) Downs. While serving a short term LDS mission his cousin, John Stoker of Bountiful, UT visited him on Nov 8, 1869. Simeon resided on the farm until his death, June 27, 1889.
      4-[Rachel Graybill], born Mar 1838 probably in Caldwell Co., MO, and died in 1848 near Quincy, Adams Co., IL.
      3-[Joseph Levi Graybill], born 12 Mar 1818 in Jackson Co., OH. Baptized by John A. Fisher on 17 November 1833. Ordained an Elder in 1836. Moved to Caldwell Co., MO in 1837. Moved to IL in 1839. Ordained a seventy on May 3, 1839. Married Patience Smith on Jun 20, 1841. Moved to Nauvoo, IL in 1845 and to Pottawattamie Co., IA in 1846. He was baptized a member of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 6 August 1861 by W. W. Blair.
      3-[George Washington Graybill], born 26 Jun 1821 in Jackson Co., OH. Married Mary Smith. In 1862 after she died (Feb 16, 1860 in Iowa), George married her sister, Hannah, who had been twice widowed. She had six children and George had ten, together they had three more. George was buried in the cemetery at Underwood, Iowa. Mary is buried in the Graybill/Stoker Cemetery near Council Bluffs.
      3-[William Lenore Graybill], born 25 Jan 1825, married Hanna Pilling who was born 3 Mar 1835 in Lancashire, England. William died January 25, 1880 and is buried in the Stoker/Graybill Cemetery.
      3-[Juliana Graybill], born 19 Jan 1826, married Wilford Heath Hudson. Went to Utah. Died 8 May 1851.
      3-[Michael Graybill], born 19 Jan 1825. Living in Harrison Co., IA on Feb 27, 1870 when John Stoker of Bountiful, Utah, visited him. He never married. At age 40 he was injured in a runaway accident and lived as an invalid until age 82. He resembled his cousin, Michael Stoker, so closely that Polly Brittann Hughes upon meeting her future husband thought he was Michael Graybill whom she had known.
      3-[Mary Ann Graybill], born 25 Feb 1830, married Wilford Heath Hudson. Went to Utah.
      3-[Elizabeth Graybill], born 16 Sep 1833, was living in Harrison Co., IA on Feb 27, 1870 when her cousin, John Stoker of Bountiful, visited her at which time she was living with her brothers, Sidney Rigdon and Michael.
      3-[Sidney Rigdon Graybill], born 6 Apr 1836 in Jackson Co., OH, was living in Harrison Co., IA when his cousin, John Stoker, visited him on Feb 27, 1870. He married Jane Davis."

      16. Partial transcription from an article entitled "Michael Stoker and Catherine Eller." from the book "Our Stoker Family Histories 1731-1881," Vol. II, comp. and ed. by Elayne Stoker, 2004, printed by Stevenson's Genealogy Center, Provo, UT. See notes of Michael Stoker for full transcription of this article:
      "During the Adams County time period some of the Stoker men found work with a farmer named Coleman Wilkes. Mr. Wilkes lived approximately two miles southeast of Columbus, Ohio. He had first offered work and a home to Elizabeth's husband, James Welker, and soon after David, John W., Michael, and Jacob also obtained work with him. Here they labored diligently trying to earn enough to rebuild their supplies and stock which they had lost during the Missouri struggles.
      Moving to Bear Creek, Hancock Co., Illinois
      On July 1, 1839 the Mormon Church's prophet and leader, Joseph Smith, called for all church members to settle in and around the Commerce, Illinois area. The town of Commerce was renamed by the church members to Nauvoo. In 1842 the Stoker family had complied. Packing up their belongings they moved north settling their families around the Carthage/Bear Creek area. James Welker's son, John, recorded: "...he found that there was land that could be entered in Hancock County, about 15 miles south of Nauvoo. He moved there and filed on a homestead. Part of it was prairie land and part was timber. He built a large hewed two roomed log house. Then the next thing was to fence and make a farm to make a living off of" (Ibid).
      The 1842 personal property tax assessment book of Hancock County has records for Stoker, Welker, and Graybill families living within the county. These records indicate the possibility that they lived outside of the cities."
      Building the Nauvoo Temple
      The Stoker families were on hand for the building of the temple for their church. It is recorded in the church history that Eller Stoker, Jacob Stoker, and John McDaniel (husband to Christine Stoker) worked on the temple for a period of time. All families were expected to donate time and supplies to the temple project...
      Life was beginning to flourish again for the families, and happy times were with them. On May 23, 1844 Joseph Levi Graybill, Eller Stoker, and Michael Stoker were initiated and passed into the Nauvoo Lodge of Masons. Two weeks later Levi Graybill, Eller Stoker, and Michael Stoker became lodge members, and on June 8th they were raised to Master Masons. While in Illinois, John Stoker, John W. Stoker, John Welker Eller Stoker, and Jacob Stoker were given church callings of Office of the Seventy.
      Death of Joseph and Hyrum Smith
      Living around Carthage the Stoker, Graybill, and McDaniel families were homesteading lands close to those who most violently disagreed with the Mormons and who were constantly calling for their removal. Sometimes these men formed their own vigilante groups trying to scare the Mormons into leaving. Some of the Stoker men folk were called into military duty within the State Militia as recorded in the history of John McDaniel.
      "Early on June 24, Joseph and Hyrum Smith, John Taylor, and fifteen other members of the Nauvoo city council headed to Carthage to answer the charges filed against them. They passed the home of William Stoker located six miles southeast of Nauvoo on the Carthage Road before 8 A.M.... Sometime after noon, the Stokers saw the mounted riders traveling toward Nauvoo. Arriving at their destination at 2:30, the leaders gathered three small cannons and about two hundred firearms which were turned over to the militia. At nearly midnight the militia delivered the Mormon leaders who came voluntarily to the authorities in Carthage... Thursday June 27 Joseph and his brother Hyrum, were martyred. A mob of about one hundred men with blackened faces gathered about five 'clock in the afternoon. Several stormed the jail where the Smith brothers and a few friends were sequestered. Joseph and Hyrum were shot dead, and John Taylor wounded...the assassins and their comrades fled Carthage to Warsaw and then sought refuge west of the Mississippi River... Friday June 28, with the bodies of the slain leaders placed in two different wagons, covered with branches to shade them from the hot sun, Willard Richards, Samuel Smith, and Artois Hamilton pulled out of Carthage and headed for Nauvoo. Sometimes shortly after noon, the procession with eight soldiers passed by William Stoker's driving teams pulling the two wagons containing the bodies of the martyrs. Mary Stoker Aitken, a granddaughter of William Stoker and Almira Winegar, wrote, "My father [John Stephen Stoker] told us that his parents had told him that they had seen the bodies of the Prophet and his brother Hyrum Smith, being taken from Carthage to Nauvoo." ...One of the Stoker relative's narrative mentions that "After the deaths of Joseph and Hyrum in 1844, Simeon Graybill went up to Nauvoo to help guard the secretly hidden bodies of Joseph and Hyrum. Fearful the anti-Mormon mob might try to do further violence to Joseph and Hyrum's bodies, their caskets were filled with sand for public burial" (Ibid).
      Conflict/Harassment Again.
      In 1845 the mobbing and burnings began, starting with the outlying settlements. The Stokers were living within the church area called the Highland branch of Illinois. The babies, weddings, and all manner of social life continued on and in July the families were doing more temple work for their ancestors. Again the families grew; new events were attended to. Jacob and John Stoker also joined the Masons and were later raised to Master Masons.
      Sheriff of Hancock County ordered the saints to organize and protect themselves. "John Welker tells how he and his cousins mutually watched out for each other. His account follows: 'The mob (against) the Latter-day Saints was increasing and I but a boy of 18 was the oldest of the boys that was at hoe. My oldest brother was married and doing for himself. I was the one to look after the family after my father died and when the burning out of the later day Saints by the mob commenced close by I was in a settlement 10 miles for whare {sic} they were burning houses and some of my cousins and relative lived close to whare {sic} I lived. We got together and agreed to take turnes {sic} and watch the mob and do the best we could to protect our homes. Some one was out every night watching their movements. They did not come to our little settlement to burn us out, if they had come some of them would have been hurt. Thare {sic} is many things connected with this I will not write.' (Punctuation added.)
      Not all of the Stoker relatives were as fortunate as the Welkers, John McDaniel and his wife Christine Stoker, according to one history, "...were greatly persecuted with the other saints and several times were driven out by the mobs. On one occasion they were attacked and forced to flee with a child under each arm while their home was burned" (Ibid).
      Nauvoo Temple Dedicated.
      In late 1845 the church's Nauvoo Temple was dedicated and many of the saints came to the temple to perform their own religious (endowment) ordinances. Between January 5 and January 21, of 1846 sixteen heads of the Stoker clan had received their own temple endowment.
      Michael Stoker Jr. and Catherine Burcham
      Jacob Stoker and Martha Carr McDaniel
      Eller Stoker and Margaret Judd
      Catherine Eller Stoker (widow)
      Elizabeth Stoker Welker (widow)
      James W. Welker and Anna Pugh
      John Stoker and Jane McDaniel
      John W. Stoker and Sara McDaniel
      William Stoker and Almira Winegar
      Records from the Nauvoo temple show that the Stoker family participated in other religious temple activities: Catherine Eller Stoker, Michael Stoker (son), Eller Stoker (son) and wife Margaret (Judd) Stoker (Eller's wife), James Welker and wife Elizabeth Stoker Welker, and Mary (Polly) Stoker (Graybill) all did baptisms by proxy for their deceased relatives."

      BIOGRAPHY:
      1. From the RLDS publication "Journal of History," vol. 4, num. 1, Jan, 1911, pp. 104-110 (includes photo of Levi). Levi had been prominent in the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and his testimony reflects many of the RLDS beliefs after 1844. The text: "Testimony of Elder Levi Graybill. (We herewith present the testimony of Father Graybill, whom we believe to be the senior member of the [RLDS] church.) I, Levi Graybill, now of Pottawattamie County, Iowa, my pilgrimage having been extended far beyond that of the average man, and knowing that I must soon pass away, am desirous of leaving on record my testimony to the work of the Lord as it has been revealed and established in these last days. I was born in Bloomfield Township, Jackson County, Ohio, March 12, 1818, and was 92 years old March 12, 1910. I was baptized into the Latter Day Saints' Church November 17, 1833, and have been a member of that church ever since that time. I was ordained an elder in the year 1836, in Jackson County, Ohio. I visited Kirtland, Ohio, while that was the headquarters of the church. I was well acquainted with Joseph the Martyr, with Hyrum, Sidney Rigdon, and most of the leaders of the church. I got acquainted with Joseph at Kirtland. I went with my father's family and others to Caldwell County, Missouri, in the autumn of 1837, and was with the Saints there in the time of their terrible trials. We planted a crop there in the spring of 1838, which we were never permitted to harvest. I was a member of the State Militia under Colonel Hickle. The mob came upon us near Far West, in October, 1838. For weeks before the mob came upon us they had been stealing and driving off our stock; taking a team of horses and wagon from my father, and all the horse[s] I owned. When the mob came upon us first they demanded that Joseph Smith, Parley P. Pratt, Sidney Rigdon, Lyman Wight, and George W. Robinson appear in camp. Colonel Hinkle, through cowardice and treachery, surrendered these men, telling us that these Missourians wanted to have a talk with them. Imagine our surprise when we were informed that these men were prisoners in the hands of a merciless, bloodthirsty mob. We were told by the mob that we would never see those beloved leaders again, as they would be shot the next morning at 9 o'clock at Far West. How our hearts did ache and what mental anguish we endured as we contemplated the sacrifice of these men, and you may imagine that many an earnest prayer went up to the Lord of hosts during the night. It is morally certain that had it not been for the providence of God these men would have met the fate intended by their captors, General Doniphan (honored forever be his name) took a firm stand against the wicked intentions of the mob, telling them that the carrying out of the order would be cold-blooded murder. The mob held council over us for two or three days to decide what should be the fate of the people, whether they should be put to death or driven from the State in harmony with the murderous exterminating order issued by Governor Boggs. I am of the opinion that the determined stand taken by General Doniphan helped us not a little, and probably saved our lives. The impetuous Lyman Wight, with whom I was well acquainted, wanted to fight the mob giving as his opinion that it would be only a breakfast spell to whip the Missourians, Lyman was a brave and good man, knowing not what fear was. When told by one of the mobocrats that he would be shot the next morning if he did not betray Joseph Smith, he replied, 'Shoot and be damned, for that is what you will get anyway.' It is to be hoped that the recording angel dropped a tear on the little swear word, and thus blotted it out for ever. These were indeed the times that tried men's souls, and if our religion had been what the world is prone to believe; if there had not been in and with it not only the saving power of God, but the divine evidence of its truth, surely we would have abandoned it, and thus saved ourselves from robbery, persecution, and death. But God in his mercy had given us the knowledge of his truth, and not all the power of men and devils could drive us from it. We could be despoiled, we could die, but we could not forsake the way of the Lord. It was during these dark and trying days that incidents occurred to show us the true character of Joseph Smith in all its grandeur. While the mob was destroying, stealing, and burning our property, and while some of our men wanted to resist and try to drive the mob, he exhorted them to take joyfully the spoiling of the goods and not return evil for evil. At the time of the trouble at Far West the report was sent to the governor by evil designing men that we had the town of Far West walled in a mile square, the wall being 16 feet high and 10 feet thick. The fact was we had no breastworks, and had made little preparation to repel an attack, and the night before we surrendered I and the company of militia to which I belonged toiled all night making a rude breastwork of logs, rails, and dirt. Two incidents that occurred then should be recorded. While we were under guard one of the guards called to me. At first I paid no attention to his call, but after it was repeated a few times I went to him and asked him what he wanted. He said 'I just wanted to talk with you. He said 'you are in bad hands, and we pity you. Jackson County had been settled 26 years, and Caldwell County but 3 years, and this is the best improved county. We know that you could not have accomplished what you have if you had been the kind of people you are represented to be.' This shows that not all the Missourians were bad; but this was an exception. They were blinded by prejudice and false reports. This man asked where that company of white horses were. I told him that I did now know of but four white horses that belonged to us. He said as they were coming in they saw a company of white horses one half mile long between them and Far West. Their riders were dressed in white, and carried silver trumpets. He said they halted until this white robed company went away. This man was from Jackson County. Another man, by the name of Julius Beach, from Ray County, told the same story, only he made the number greater, saying that it took an half hour for them to pass a given point. I left Far West just before Christmas, 1838, arriving at Hannibal, Missouri, Christmas Day. I chopped cord wood and split rails near Hannibal for the purpose of getting money to help my father's family away from Missouri; but when I came to settle I had to take my pay out of the store, so I was compelled to trudge back through the snow, over two hundred miles, I secured the use of a team to take my father's family to Illinois. We settled on the Mississippi, ten miles below Quincy, Illinois. This was in the spring of 1839. I was married to Patience Smith June 21, 184l she shared my joys and sorrows for 54 years; when she fell asleep in Jesus, and now awaits me on the other shore. We moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, in the fall of 1845. I was present at the April conference in Nauvoo in 1844, and I here state that at this conference I heard the Prophet state publicly that he had had the care of the church for fourteen years, and that he was weary; that he had labored hard to establish the church, and must rest; and that he longed to see the day that he could take his satchel and travel under the direction of young Joseph. And to the Twelve he said, 'It is for you to bear the kingdom to the nations of the earth.' I was well acquainted with Joseph and Hyrum Smith, and most all of the early leaders of the church, and I do not believe that such a thing as polygamy was ever practiced by any of them during the lifetime of the martyrs. At the conference of April, 1844, Hyrum Smith said from the stand that some had been teaching spiritual wifery, which meant polygamy, and addressing the sisters he said: 'If any man makes such a proposition to you, if you will put a dagger to his heart I will plead your cause in the day of judgment.' The first of the g[i]fts I ever witnessed I was in Jackson County, Ohio, shortly after I was baptized. My own sister Catherine, afterwards the wife of Philip Gatrost, spoke in tongues. Some time after this the same sister spoke tongues again, when there was a linguist present by the name John D. Baker, and he said the tongue spoken was Hebrew and that she had evidently learned the language; but I know she had not. I myself enjoyed the gifts to some extent. My poor, weak, stammering tongue has been made to speak the praises of God, and tell of his goodness and promised blessings, in language incomprehensible to me. God has mercifully healed the sick sometimes instantaneously, under my hands, and in answer to my feeble prayers, of this I speak in humble reverence to his great name. One more instance I wish to speak of. I was with the emigration that came from Nauvoo in the spring of 1846, and arrived at Kanesville, now Council Bluffs, in June of that year. I think that it was in the spring of 1847 that Bishop George Miller came from the East, and stated to us that we had no church, for the church could not exist without a head, and that we were without a prophet in the flesh. It was this reasoning that moved the church to elect Brigham Young president, seer, and revelator. The vote was taken at a time that the members were called together for the purpose, when it was well known that the great body of the church was not there. I stood aloof from Brigham Young and all the other factions, staying on the Iowa side of the Missouri River. I was baptized into the Reorganized Church in 1859 by Bro. William W. Blair, when he and Edmund C. Briggs first came to Iowa. I had waited long and anxiously during the dark days for the coming of young Joseph to take his father's place, an event which had been impressed upon my mind by the Holy Spirit. I was sent on a mission to Kentucky and Tennessee in 1865, and after returning from there labored locally until old age compelled me to desist. I received my patriarchal blessing under the hands of Hyrum Smith, and have found it true as the years have come and gone. I bear my testimony here probably for the last time upon earth, for in all human probability before this shall appear in print I shall have passed to the beyond; but I want my words to be had by posterity. I know that this is the work of God; and that the gospel of Christ is the power of God unto salvation. While I am very feeble in body, my mind is clear and my memory is perfect as to things about which I here testify. In taking leave of you I exhort you all to contend earnestly for the faith. Keep it in purity of soul, untainted by sectarianism, for that is the great danger of the church. Stand in the way and inquire for old paths. Be kind and merciful to one another; bearing with and strengthening each other. With this council I give you my blessing and benediction. Levi Graybill."

      2. Patriarchal blessing from Hyrum Smith at Nauvoo, IL, Oct. 4, 1841: "Beloved Brother I lay my hands upon your head in the name of Jesus to bless you with a blessing, which is called Patriarchal and confirm upon your head your Ordination into the Priesthood and to seal a promise upon you of the gift of that Priesthood to your full satisfaction at a more mature age, after experience has rolled over your head. Then shall ye behold the display of the goodness of God, unto your satisfaction. Then shell ye appreciate all his Mercies and be enabled to do good in your Calling, wherein you are called, then shall you be a chosen vessel having received the anointing and the Endowment in the Lord's House. Then shall your ministry be prosperous and your blessing not a few, and your study from this time forth, must be in the Revelations both in the Old and in the New Testament, all the words of the Apostles and Prophets (exclusive of the Law of Moses), the Book of Mormon and the Book of Covenants, and if you will be faithful in your Calling, you shall have an inheritance in Zion in your Father's House, in the lineage of your Father which is of the seed of Abraham, in the tribe of Zebulon and a crown of Immortality and Eternal life in the Celestial Glory. Amen."

      3. See notes of father-in-law John Smith for extensive biography on entire family including this individual.

      4. Website http://iagenweb.org/pottawattamie/Biographies.htm accessed 13 Dec 2008:
      "Name: Graybill, Levi and Patience Submitted by: Gail Meyer Kilgore, Mar 2003 Publication: written by Neva Kuhr Levi Graybill was born in Bloomfield Township, Jackson County, Ohio on March 12, 1818 and died Nov. 30